Gaming is eating the world.

So says a new report issued Tuesday by L.A.-based investment firm MaC Venture Capital.

The report mentions the recent explosion of gaming companies – including Epic Games' $1.78 billion raise that valued it at $17.3 billion, Unity's $1.3 billion IPO that valued the Epic competitor at $13.7 billion and Roblox's $150 million fundraise that valued the kid's gaming "sandbox" at $4 billion — and that was before the pandemic boosted Roblox's user base.

But most of the analysis is devoted to the techniques and tools that gaming has popularized over the years, and that are fast proliferating into areas as diverse as retail, film production, medicine and national defense.

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  • As school gets back in session, the pandemic has limited the number of available extracurricular activities
  • PlayVS, which helps schools compete in esports leagues, expects participation this year to double or triple, due at least in part to COVID
  • Not all schools view esports the same way, and many are still considering the pros and cons

Under normal circumstances, going back to school is not just the start of a new academic year, but the renewal of extracurricular activities, whether on the debate stage or under the Friday night lights. This year, however, the pandemic has made gridiron glory and other activities nearly impossible. Could that lead to a banner year for high school esports?

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Two companies betting on the Los Angeles eSports market aren't throwing in on glitzy, state of the art stadiums or sinking big bucks into the pros: They're banking on the average Joe.

The video game industry has been red hot, surpassing $120 billion last year. Many in the marketplace think the next area for growth is in the amateurs; a vast pool of recreational players who can, if provided the infrastructure, make hay for investors as competitive players.

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