At a virtual town hall held Thursday by dot.LA and PledgeLA to identify actions leaders in the L.A. tech and startup community can take now to break down racial barriers to jobs and capital, and to democratize economic opportunity for the region -- there were ultimately a robust number of questions asked and interest expressed around the issue, though tangible actions remain to be seen.

Nearly 30 years after the 1992 riots in Los Angeles, protesters across the U.S. gathered this time to march against systemic racism and violence faced by the black community after George Floyd was killed while in police custody in Minneapolis.

Across social media, tech companies in L.A. and beyond have posted and tweeted their support for #blacklivesmatter, muted their feeds, and opened their pocketbooks, while music companies took part in a blackout. Companies have also donated to various diversity, equity and inclusion causes, but it remains an open question as to what impact those efforts will have.

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Our new video interview series dot.LA Dives In seeks to delve beneath the surface of the Los Angeles tech and startup scene. The plan is simple: Shine a light on the innovation in L.A.'s tech and startup community by sharing perspectives straight from the change-makers themselves. The first installment is with Miki Reynolds, the executive director and co-founder of Grid110, an economic and community development nonprofit dedicated to creating clearer pathways to success for early-stage entrepreneurs in Los Angeles.

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In this episode of dot.LA Convenes, dot.LA's speaker series devoted to empowering women in tech, we focus on age and how it uniquely affects women at every stage of their careers.

Younger women, especially in the tech community, often struggle to build credibility and to be taken seriously. As they age, societal expectations around family arise, and later in life they face questions about our ability to stay.

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