remote work

When fully vaccinated employees at one of L.A.'s biggest venture firms began trickling back into the office at the beginning of May, they felt a bit uncomfortable.

"Everyone felt awkward," remembers Mark Suster, Upfront Ventures' General Partner. "It was really awkward sitting in front of people again."

After more than a year confined to only seeing a few family members face-to-face and perhaps the occasional masked walk with friends and colleagues, it felt strange to suddenly be sitting unmasked next to each other in conference rooms.

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Before COVID, just 35 of the approximately 50,000 employees at the city of Los Angeles worked remotely.

When the pandemic hit last March, it fell to Ted Ross, the city's chief information officer, to get 18,173 workers to go remote in the span of ten days.

Now, as some of L.A.'s massive workforce prepares to return to their downtown offices as they await guidance from the L.A. County Department of Public Health, Ross thinks the success of the last year has proven remote work should be here to stay. But not everyone in city government agrees with him.

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The L.A. tech and startup community was active as ever this week. dot.LA chief host and correspondent Kelly O'Grady takes you through the key points of the top five headlines:

  • Investors still want their startups to have an office
  • Music-tech startups are reshaping the music industry forever
  • Election tech seeks to promote voting amid pandemic
  • L.A. school district still doesn't know how many kids are without WiFi
  • Stop! Go! After back and forth, Lyft and Uber win stay in California
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