metaverse

metaverse

Photo by Hume

In the past year, musicians including Megan Thee Stallion and Travis Scott have forged their way into metaverse-related businesses by hosting virtual reality (VR) concerts. It’s no surprise then that the metaverse, still in its early stages of development, has captured the attention of some of the largest investors over the past few years. And a handful of Los Angeles-based music companies invested in the metaverse are trying to capitalize on the moment. Two such companies are Hume, a web3 record label and music NFT project Blocktones, that creates unique tracks minted on the Ethereum blockchain. We spoke to them to find out if musicians along with the music industry will embrace the metaverse.

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If you’ve fallen down the virtual influencer rabbit hole and have a fave computer-created, made-up digital human — like Lil Miquela or Nobody Sausage — struggling to feed itself with digital food, you can help it out with VIM.

VIM, according to the company’s website, stands for “Virtual Influencer Mining.” The creators call it “a Create to Earn (C2E) system.” Players don’t just support virtual characters in the metaverse but also earn from supporting them.

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Photo by David Ruano/ dot.LA

What’s in a name? Shakespeare didn’t hold much stock in the power of monikers, but the speakers at Friday’s “Building the Metaverse” panel disagreed. And if you ask them, the metaverse is a prime example.

Their argument goes that before Facebook changed its name to Meta, no one was giving the metaverse serious thought. But the day after, “everyone all of a sudden had a metaverse initiative,” said Sly Lee, co-founder and CEO of Emerge, a startup building a platform for touch within the metaverse.

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