More than a year ago, Darius Kemp, then a community manager at cannabis delivery app Eaze, realized the platform didn't have any Black-owned products on their menu.

Today he is Eaze's head of equity and change, spearheading a program for change and to prevent that from ever happening again.

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Wu-Tang Clan rapper Method Man recently launched a cannabis brand, "Taking Into Consideration All Lives," that will highlight racial injustice..

Former Disney star Bella Thorne has a brand called Forbidden Flowers that she will use to talk about the flower's healing powers, the original puffer Snoop Dogg has partnerships with Canopy Growth and billionaire rap mogul Jay-Z became the chief strategist for Caliva last year giving the brand an edge.

Celebrities are cashing in big on California's green rush and putting their own signature on it.

Shavo Odadjian, bassist for L.A. metal giants System of a Down is trimmed from the same mold. His 2018 startup, 22Red, celebrates creative minds and has a music production wing. He sees 22Red not just as a purveyor of cannabis, but of music, art and fashion. And it's just getting started.

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California is the world's largest legal pot market, generating nearly $3.1 billion in spending in the Golden State alone. But cannabis-related businesses in the U.S. live in a legal-limbo, operating in this strange gray area between federal laws that make marijuana illegal and states that have decriminalized its use and sale entirely. This has led to sometimes difficult choices, workarounds and issues with which the cannabis and cannabis-linked companies are forced to contend.

dot.LA dove into this tenuous landscape during a virtual panel discussion on Tuesday with experts in cannabis compliance and legal issues, asking them: Is the green rush over? The consensus seemed to be that no, it isn't, but this first wave of "reckless money," likely is.

Tuesday's conversation on the current state and future of California's marijuana marketplace capped off the conclusion of dot.LA's five-part investigative series examining the rapid rise and rapid fall of L.A.-based Genius Fund, a one-time $164 million cannabis company. Today that money is gone and their Russian oligarch investor is dead.

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