Netflix Is Bringing Its TikTok-Like Comedy Feed to TVs

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Netflix Is Bringing Its TikTok-Like Comedy Feed to TVs

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Netflix is testing its TikTok-like feed of comedy clips on TVs, bringing the short-form videos to bigger screens.


The streaming giant, which has a huge footprint in Los Angeles, is rolling out its Fast Laughs feature on its TV app to users in the U.S. and other English-speaking countries, according to The Verge. Fast Laughs, which lets viewers scroll through funny clips from Netflix’s extensive comedy catalog, was launched last March exclusively on the Netflix mobile app.

Netflix has pitched the feature as a way for users to discover new movies, shows and stand-up comedy specials. Instead of using an algorithm to show personalized recommendations, the Fast Laughs feed is curated by Netflix staffers. Conscious of the R-rated nature of much of the content, adult profiles can access the feature.

Unsurprisingly, the feed closely resembles TikTok’s enormously popular platform: Fast Laughs’ videos are presented vertically, while users have the ability to share clips directly through social media and messaging apps. Culver City-based TikTok’s rapid rise has influenced copycats both big and small; social media giants such as Snap and Meta have also launched their own short-form video features, while smaller L.A.-area content startups have released similar apps, as well.

Fast Laughs’ move to TV reflects the emergence of connected TVs, or “smart” TVs, which have become lucrative advertising platforms for streaming services. TikTok has also ventured into larger screens, launching its own smart TV app in November.

A Netflix spokesperson did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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