As Its Stock Drops, Netflix's Employee Morale Is In Freefall, Too
Photo by Venti Views on Unsplash

As Its Stock Drops, Netflix's Employee Morale Is In Freefall, Too

Netflix’s poor first-quarter earnings report has led to both a falling stock price and falling workforce morale.

After the streaming service disclosed a large subscriber loss in its earnings last week—triggering a roughly 40% decline in its shares since—many Netflix employees are reconsidering their futures at the company, with their confidence in its future direction shaken and their stock options looking increasingly skint, Bloomberg reported. Some employees have even requested new stock grants to make up for their losses, according to The Information.


The disappointing results have also led Netflix to evaluate its current spending levels, which will likely force employees to succeed with smaller budgets and fewer people. Bloomberg reported that Netflix is already restructuring teams in its engineering department—which have largely consisted of one leader overseeing a team of similarly-ranked people—to add seniority levels, a move considered to be a cost-cutting measure.

Other changes have already occurred in Netflix’s animation department, where the company has laid off Phil Rynda, its director of creative leadership and development for original animation, and several other employees, The Wrap reported last week.

Netflix has grown from 2,000 to 11,000 employees in the last eight years, according to Bloomberg, with most of its new hires based either internationally or in Hollywood. Co-founder Reed Hastings has boasted of a company culture based on freedom and responsibility—values that could now come under pressure amid heightened constraints.

Netflix disclosed its first net subscriber loss in over a decade in its earnings report, placing much of the blame on password-sharing—a practice it said it would be cracking down on. The company also indicated that it will be incorporating ads via a cheaper subscription tier to entice new subscribers.

Subscribe to our newsletter to catch every headline.

Cadence
Meet the Bird ‘Fleet Managers’ Who Hunt and Release E-Scooters in Downtown Los Angeles
Photo by Maylin Tu

It’s Friday night in Downtown Los Angeles and fleet manager Adan Aceves is cruising the streets in his Ford Ranger pickup truck looking for a bird — not an e-scooter, but an actual bird.

“First time I saw the bird I was wondering what the hell is it doing in Downtown?,” said Aceves. “It doesn't seem like a city bird, like a pigeon or a seagull…The second time I realized, ‘Damn, I only find this fool in Skid Row.’”

We never come across the mysterious bird who acts like a human. Instead, we drive the streets of Downtown, dropping off and picking up scooters — a different type of Bird — under the bright lights and amid throngs of people, many of them dressed to the nines and out on the town, looking for a good time.

By day, Aceves, 41, works in his family’s business repairing power tools in South Central. By night, he deploys, charges and rebalances e-scooters for Bird, one of eleven fleet managers located Downtown. The zone that he covers includes Dignity Health on Grand Avenue (once called California Hospital) where he was born.

Read moreShow less
Maylin Tu
Maylin Tu is a freelance writer who lives in L.A. She writes about scooters, bikes and micro-mobility. Find her hovering by the cheese at your next local tech mixer.
Sunset over LA
Courtesy of Cedric Letsch on Unsplash

Yesterday afternoon millions Californians around the state received an emergency alert straight to their mobile phones asking them to conserve power as the electric grid teetered on edge of collapse. The move came as the state battles on through an historic heatwave that has laid bare the shortcoming of its infrastructure in the face of a new and hotter climate.

Read moreShow less
David Shultz

David Shultz reports on clean technology and electric vehicles, among other industries, for dot.LA. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, Outside, Nautilus and many other publications.

RELATEDTRENDING
LA TECH JOBS
interchangeLA