‘Stranger Things’ Gives Netflix a Much-Needed Boost

Kristin Snyder

Kristin Snyder is dot.LA's 2022/23 Editorial Fellow. She previously interned with Tiger Oak Media and led the arts section for UCLA's Daily Bruin.

‘Stranger Things’ Gives Netflix a Much-Needed Boost
Courtesy of Netflix

“Stranger Things” just gave Netflix a sorely-needed win, drawing record viewership over the holiday weekend.

Based on Netflix’s internal metrics, viewers watched a combined 287 million hours of season 4, volume 1 of the coming-of-age sci-fi drama, which premiered on Friday. This marks the largest premiere weekend for an English-language TV show on the platform, surpassing “Bridgerton” season 2’s haul of 193 million hours, according to Variety.


Each episode’s lengthy runtime likely helped “Stranger Things” claim the top spot; the shortest episode of the new season is just over an hour long, while the longest is around one hour and forty minutes. The show’s three previous seasons also snuck back into Netflix’s top 10 last week, while its influence is being felt across other media platforms as well: Kate Bush’s 1985 song “Running Up That Hill” catapulted to the no. 1 spot on iTunes after its inclusion in season 4, while the fantasy tabletop game “Dungeons & Dragons,” which also features prominently, is having a moment.

That kind of impact comes at a cost: Netflix reportedly spent an average of $30 million on each episode of the new season of “Stranger Things.” Such spending may have to be curbed amid the streamer’s recent struggles, as evidenced by a poor first-quarter earnings report that saw the company lose subscribers for the first time in more than a decade. That subsequently sent Netflix's stock price tumbling and has triggered layoffs and cultural shifts inside the company.

Still, “Stranger Things” has given Netflix a huge boost at a difficult time, and it’s not over yet: Volume 2 of the fourth season, consisting of two feature film-length episodes, drops on July 1. In the company’s April earnings call, co-CEO Ted Sarandos said the season 4’s two-part release was intended to be “satisfying for the binger or the one-at-a-time viewer, as well.”

But no party lasts forever: When “Stranger Things” comes to a close after its fifth and final season, Netflix's strategy for filling the upside-down void left by one of its most beloved and marketable properties could involve a dubious mix of gaming, livestreaming, ad-supported programming and multiple transphobicstand-up comedy specials.

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The Streamy Awards: The War Between Online Creators and Traditional Media Is Just Beginning

Kristin Snyder

Kristin Snyder is dot.LA's 2022/23 Editorial Fellow. She previously interned with Tiger Oak Media and led the arts section for UCLA's Daily Bruin.

tiktok influencers around a trophy ​
Andria Moore /Charli D'Amelio/Addison Rae/JiDion

Every year, the Streamy Awards, which is considered the top award show within the creator economy, reveals which creators are capturing the largest audiences. This past Sunday, the event, held at The Beverly Hilton, highlighted some of the biggest names in the influencer game, chief among them Mr. Beast and Charli D’Amelio. It had all the trappings of a traditional award show—extravagant gowns, quippy acceptance speeches and musical interludes. But, as TikTok creator Adam Rose told The Washington Post, the Streamys still lacks the legitimacy of traditional award shows.

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Slingshot Aerospace Is Expanding Its Network of Telescopes To Make Tracking Data Even More Accurate

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College and previously covered technology and entertainment for TheWrap and reported on the SoCal startup scene for the Los Angeles Business Journal. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

Slingshot Aerospace Is Expanding Its Network of Telescopes To Make Tracking Data Even More Accurate
Photo: Slingshot Aerospace

Slingshot Aerospace, the El Segundo-based startup developing software for managing objects in space’s orbit, raised $40.9 million to build out its global network of sensors and recruit new customers both private and public.

The round was a follow-on to Slingshot’s $25 million Series A-1 raise in March.

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Blink Charging Knows That 'Long-Term' They Need Two Revenue Streams

David Shultz

David Shultz reports on clean technology and electric vehicles, among other industries, for dot.LA. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, Outside, Nautilus and many other publications.

charging station
Blink Charging

It ain’t easy being a charging company…or at least a lot of them aren’t making it look easy. Between reports of abysmal charger uptime, declining stock values, lack of standards and meaningless jargon (is “hyper” really faster than “ultra?”), the race to electrify America’s roads has been a bumpy one. For Miami-based Blink Charging, however, the solution to smoothing the transition may be about becoming more than just a charger company.

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