In 2022, Get Ready for a Battle of Kitchen Robot Concepts

Jake Brewer
Jake Brewer is chief strategy officer at Miso Robotics, where he focuses on customer expansion, working closely with business and product development teams to meet the demands of a changing industry.
In 2022, Get Ready for a Battle of Kitchen Robot Concepts
As Restaurants Scramble for Workers, It's 'Order Up' for Miso Robotics and Its Burger-Flipping Robot

The coming year will be a proving year around all the hype of robotics in food that was created in 2020 and 2021. In 2022, the reality will set in that the labor shortage in restaurants is not a fleeting issue, though it may become less acute than it had been during the height of the pandemic. Restaurants will need to expand their robotics and AI pilots and roll-out new solutions.


The previous three years have felt a little like the 1997-2000 dot-com era for restaurant robotics companies. At that time, everyone knew the web was the future, and money was flooding in, but there weren’t yet any substantial winners and it was hard to predict exactly how the disruption would occur.. 2022 (and 2023) will be when we find out who can actually operationalize their product to solve the massive issues that aren’t going away for the food service industry.

I think that we will actually start seeing brand spec robotics and AI as early as 2022 within their standard new-restaurant package. Moving from proof of concept to industry standard is massive. Big restaurant chains will expand and begin to trust and try a variety of new automation products on the market, rather than just “exploring” individual robots as a kind of one-off approach.’ Artificial intelligence will also develop to a point where even mom-and-pop restaurants will have access to that type of technology to try out.

The tide has turned to food technology. Next year will be the year many realize it’s not going back.

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How Women’s Purchasing Power Is Creating a New Wave of Economic Opportunities In Sports

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

How Women’s Purchasing Power Is Creating a New Wave of Economic Opportunities In Sports
Samson Amore

According to a Forbes report last April, both the viewership and dollars behind women’s sports at a collegiate and professional level are growing.

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https://twitter.com/samsonamore
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LA Tech Week Day 5: Social Highlights
Evan Xie

L.A. Tech Week has brought venture capitalists, founders and entrepreneurs from around the world to the California coast. With so many tech nerds in one place, it's easy to laugh, joke and reminisce about the future of tech in SoCal.

Here's what people are saying about the fifth day of L.A. Tech Week on social:

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LA Tech Week: How These Six Greentech Startups Are Tackling Major Climate Issues

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

LA Tech Week: How These Six Greentech Startups Are Tackling Major Climate Issues
Samson Amore

At Lowercarbon Capital’s LA Tech Week event Thursday, the synergy between the region’s aerospace industry and greentech startups was clear.

The event sponsored by Lowercarbon, Climate Draft (and the defunct Silicon Valley Bank’s Climate Technology & Sustainability team) brought together a handful of local startups in Hawthorne not far from LAX, and many of the companies shared DNA with arguably the region’s most famous tech resident: SpaceX.

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samsonamore@dot.la
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