facial recognition

facial recognition

Photo illustration by Sebastian Miño-Bucheli

In 2020, Robert Julian-Borchak Williams was wrongfully arrested due to an algorithm used by the Michigan State Police who matched his driver’s license with a blurry surveillance photo. A few weeks later, Michael Oliver was arrested and charged with a felony by the Detroit police department after he was wrongfully identified by facial recognition technology (FRT).

In response, Congressman Ted W. Lieu of Los Angeles County and other House Democrats introduced the Facial Recognition Act of 2022 last week, which would place limitations and prohibitions on law enforcement use of FRT.

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Art by Ian Hurley

In Los Angeles, the cameras are everywhere. Cameras at traffic lights. Cameras on doorbells. Cameras on billions of smartphones. When your photo is snapped by these cameras, facial recognition technology can match your face to a database of millions of mug shots, potentially linking you to a crime.

Is this legal? Is this fair? Is this right?

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Venice-based Trueface is the latest computer vision startup to be snapped up by a Virginia company that sells security technology to airports across the country.

The company, called Pangiam, now has access to Trueface's suite of software powering contactless temperature checks and social distancing compliance monitoring. Last year, it installed AI-powered kiosks at U.S. Air Force bases to recognize individuals without person-to-person contact.

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