Hulu CEO Randy Freer Out, as Disney Looks to Dominate Streaming

Rachel Uranga

Rachel Uranga is dot.LA's Managing Editor, News. She is a former Mexico-based market correspondent at Reuters and has worked for several Southern California news outlets, including the Los Angeles Business Journal and the Los Angeles Daily News. She has covered everything from IPOs to immigration. Uranga is a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and California State University Northridge. A Los Angeles native, she lives with her husband, son and their felines.

Hulu CEO Randy Freer Out, as Disney Looks to Dominate Streaming

Less than a year after Disney took control of Hulu, its chief executive Randy Freer is stepping down in a move aimed at consolidating the streaming services operations with the entertainment giant's direct-to-consumer wing.


"I want to thank Randy for his leadership the last two years as CEO and for his collaboration the past several months to ensure an exceptionally bright future for Hulu," said Kevin Mayer, chairman of Disney's direct-to-consumer & international operations.

Under the move, Mayer said Disney will have Hulu's executive report to its direct-to-consumer and international team allowing the company "more effectively and efficiently deploy resources, rapidly grow our presence outside the U.S."

"With the successful launch of Disney+, we are now focused on the benefits of scale within and across our portfolio of DTC businesses," he said in a statement.

Disney took over control of the Santa Monica-based streaming giant last May after it struck a deal with Comcast to sell its stake by 2024.

Months later, Disney + launched and the entertainment behemoth quickly offered consumers bundled packages with its other brands including the streaming service and ESPN. It's in heated competition with other streaming giants to capture market share and content from across the globe.

Competitor Netflix is producing 130 seasons of local language television this year alone.

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How Women’s Purchasing Power Is Creating a New Wave of Economic Opportunities In Sports

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

How Women’s Purchasing Power Is Creating a New Wave of Economic Opportunities In Sports
Samson Amore

According to a Forbes report last April, both the viewership and dollars behind women’s sports at a collegiate and professional level are growing.

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LA Tech Week Day 5: Social Highlights
Evan Xie

L.A. Tech Week has brought venture capitalists, founders and entrepreneurs from around the world to the California coast. With so many tech nerds in one place, it's easy to laugh, joke and reminisce about the future of tech in SoCal.

Here's what people are saying about the fifth day of L.A. Tech Week on social:

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LA Tech Week: How These Six Greentech Startups Are Tackling Major Climate Issues

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

LA Tech Week: How These Six Greentech Startups Are Tackling Major Climate Issues
Samson Amore

At Lowercarbon Capital’s LA Tech Week event Thursday, the synergy between the region’s aerospace industry and greentech startups was clear.

The event sponsored by Lowercarbon, Climate Draft (and the defunct Silicon Valley Bank’s Climate Technology & Sustainability team) brought together a handful of local startups in Hawthorne not far from LAX, and many of the companies shared DNA with arguably the region’s most famous tech resident: SpaceX.

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