Hulu CEO Randy Freer Out, as Disney Looks to Dominate Streaming

Rachel Uranga

Rachel Uranga is dot.LA's Managing Editor, News. She is a former Mexico-based market correspondent at Reuters and has worked for several Southern California news outlets, including the Los Angeles Business Journal and the Los Angeles Daily News. She has covered everything from IPOs to immigration. Uranga is a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and California State University Northridge. A Los Angeles native, she lives with her husband, son and their felines.

Hulu CEO Randy Freer Out, as Disney Looks to Dominate Streaming

Less than a year after Disney took control of Hulu, its chief executive Randy Freer is stepping down in a move aimed at consolidating the streaming services operations with the entertainment giant's direct-to-consumer wing.


"I want to thank Randy for his leadership the last two years as CEO and for his collaboration the past several months to ensure an exceptionally bright future for Hulu," said Kevin Mayer, chairman of Disney's direct-to-consumer & international operations.

Under the move, Mayer said Disney will have Hulu's executive report to its direct-to-consumer and international team allowing the company "more effectively and efficiently deploy resources, rapidly grow our presence outside the U.S."

"With the successful launch of Disney+, we are now focused on the benefits of scale within and across our portfolio of DTC businesses," he said in a statement.

Disney took over control of the Santa Monica-based streaming giant last May after it struck a deal with Comcast to sell its stake by 2024.

Months later, Disney + launched and the entertainment behemoth quickly offered consumers bundled packages with its other brands including the streaming service and ESPN. It's in heated competition with other streaming giants to capture market share and content from across the globe.

Competitor Netflix is producing 130 seasons of local language television this year alone.

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The Streamy Awards: The War Between Online Creators and Traditional Media Is Just Beginning

Kristin Snyder

Kristin Snyder is dot.LA's 2022/23 Editorial Fellow. She previously interned with Tiger Oak Media and led the arts section for UCLA's Daily Bruin.

tiktok influencers around a trophy ​
Andria Moore /Charli D'Amelio/Addison Rae/JiDion

Every year, the Streamy Awards, which is considered the top award show within the creator economy, reveals which creators are capturing the largest audiences. This past Sunday, the event, held at The Beverly Hilton, highlighted some of the biggest names in the influencer game, chief among them Mr. Beast and Charli D’Amelio. It had all the trappings of a traditional award show—extravagant gowns, quippy acceptance speeches and musical interludes. But, as TikTok creator Adam Rose told The Washington Post, the Streamys still lacks the legitimacy of traditional award shows.

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Slingshot Aerospace Raises $40 Million to Expand Space Object Sensor Network

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College and previously covered technology and entertainment for TheWrap and reported on the SoCal startup scene for the Los Angeles Business Journal. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

Slingshot Aerospace Raises $40 Million to Expand Space Object Sensor Network
Photo: Slingshot Aerospace

Slingshot Aerospace, the El Segundo-based startup developing software for managing objects in space’s orbit, raised $40.9 million to build out its global network of sensors and recruit new customers both private and public.

The round was a follow-on to Slingshot’s $25 million Series A-1 raise in March.

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BlueLA, The Largest EV Car Sharing Program, Is Expanding

David Shultz

David Shultz reports on clean technology and electric vehicles, among other industries, for dot.LA. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, Outside, Nautilus and many other publications.

charging station
Blink Charging

It ain’t easy being a charging company…or at least a lot of them aren’t making it look easy. Between reports of abysmal charger uptime, declining stock values, lack of standards and meaningless jargon (is “hyper” really faster than “ultra?”), the race to electrify America’s roads has been a bumpy one. For Miami-based Blink Charging, however, the solution to smoothing the transition may be about becoming more than just a charger company.

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