#MeToo-Inspired App AllVoices Lands $4.1M

#MeToo-Inspired App AllVoices Lands $4.1M

AllVoices, an anti-harassment app inspired by the #MeToo movement, has raised $4.1 million, according to Securities and Exchange Commission filings posted last month.

Begun by former film studio executive Claire Schmidt less than two months after the Harvey Weinstein story roiled Hollywood and forever changed the conversation around sexual harassment in corporate offices, the app allows users to anonymously report information to a company's top leadership.


The seed round led by early-stage investors, Crosscut Ventures, brings the total raised by the company to $6.13 million, according to Pitchbook.

GoPro and Instacart are signed up for the app.

Schmidt, a survivor of sexual assault and former vice president at 20th Century Fox, started the company because she was moved by the stories of women coming to the forefront in recent years.

The platform takes in reports of harassment and funnels it over to a company's human resources division or top executives. Then those individuals can have an online, anonymous chat with the person filing the complaint.

AllVoices pitches itself as a way to provide companies with more transparency and understanding about what's happening with their employees.

The application also offers a dashboard function that provides an analysis of problem areas. For those whose companies aren't signed up, AllVoices asks for an email address of the individual at a company that should be alerted about the harassment.

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