Just Go Grind Podcast: TutorMe Co-Founder Myles Hunter on Raising Funds and Building International Teams

Justin Gordon
Justin Gordon is the founder of "Just Go Grind" and host of the "Just Go Grind Podcast," a daily show with more than 200 episodes featuring interviews with entrepreneurs and investors. He has an MBA from USC, is an aspiring runner with a 1:29 half marathon personal best, and wants to help one billion people in his lifetime.
Myles Hunter, co-founder of TutorMe
TutorMe

On this week's episode of Just Go Grind, hear from Myles Hunter, co-founder and CEO of Los Angeles-based TutorMe, an on-demand tutoring platform serving students from kindergarten through graduate school.


Key Takeaways:

  • Hunter used AngelList to find a technical co-founder. That decision led to him hiring a Russian and then traveling to both Russia and Bali to build the infrastructure of the company.
  • Early on, TutorMe decided to build its technical infrastructure from scratch, so they wouldn't have to use a third party and so they could keep their platform proprietary and independent.
  • After deciding TutorMe should be venture-backed, Hunter joined Jason Calacanis' accelerator program to help it grow.
"I would say to start [fundraising] early. It's a long process. There's a lot of uncertainty to the fundraising process... It's something where you have to prepare to really be rejected a lot." — Myles Hunter

Want to hear more episodes of Just Go Grind? Listen on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Google Podcasts — or wherever you get your podcasts.

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