You've started your company and it seems like the only way to raise the necessary operating capital and get this damn thing going faster is to sell a stake in your company as equity. You'd rather not sell more of the company than you absolutely have to.

There's always the very popular, but least appetizing, option of pooling all your personal credit cards into an ocean of debt (see every episode of "How I Built This" ever). But before you throw the Hail Mary, take a look at some other options. There are actually a number of alternative financing options. And thankfully, the market is responding to interest in non-dilutive capital of this kind and thus is rushing to meet the demand of this particular customer type (ie. you, my fellow entrepreneurs).

Trust me, at Fernish we know just how costly it can be to finance a new venture, what with engineers, warehouses, advertising, and furniture inventory. So, how can you finance your company other than selling a large portion of it off to investors?

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Backstage Capital, the Los Angeles venture firm founded in 2015 by Arlan Hamilton to focus on underrepresented founders, flung itself open to mom-and-pop investors and they quickly smashed down the doors. The firm launched a crowdfunding page Monday with the goal of bringing in slightly over a million dollars by the end of April, with investments ranging from $100 to $50,000.

By Monday evening, it had already raised more than $700,000 from more than 1,000 funders eager to invest alongside the likes of Sequoia Capital and Initialized in Backstage's long roster of consumer-focused startups.

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Bracket Capital, a Beverly Hills-based investment management firm focused on acquiring secondary shares in later-stage tech companies like SpaceX and Bird, announced Wednesday it has raised nearly half a billion dollars in equity.

The firm will split the cash between two funds, a traditional $150 million fund and another $350 million one that will co-invest alongside other firms.

Rather than buying stakes directly in startups, the firm said 80% of its shares come from snapping up existing shares. Those often come from early employees – tired of waiting for their company to go public – who are looking to cash out some of their equity so they can buy a house or pay for tuition.

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