data security

data security

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Between a distinguished career as a U.S. Navy officer and various roles at IT and cybersecurity firms, Glen Day became the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services’ first chief privacy officer in 2002—a role tasked with overseeing HIPAA compliance for over a million medical patients.

At the time, governments and businesses alike were only beginning to understand the importance of privacy in a budding technological world, where data still straddled both analog and digital realms. Two decades later, the evolution of data storage and the cloud have turned companies into data hoarders. As a result, security breaches have become more sophisticated, and privacy compliance—from the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation rules to California’s “right to be forgotten” law—has only increased.

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Photo by Igor Starkov on Unsplash

OpenX, a Pasadena-based ad tech company, agreed to pay $2 million to settle allegations that it amassed troves of data on children as it flaunted regulations intended to protect data privacy.

The venture-backed firm used code to “inadvertently” pull location specific data from users even when they opted out and sold children’s data to third party advertisers.

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Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

It seems like every week there's some new high profile data breach. Credit card numbers, addresses, nude photos, Democratic National Committee emails—you name it, hackers have stolen it.

Amit Saha, the CEO of Saviynt Inc, the El Segundo-based security vendor, said the problem has only gotten worse during the pandemic, with so many people working from home and using their personal computers to access corporate networks.

For Saha and his company's 750 employees, that's created a lot of work—and an opportunity. Saviynt announced Monday that they've secured $130 million in capital financing from HPS Investment Partners and PNC Bank to expand their cybersecurity SaaS technology. It's a big bet that the pandemic-fueled demand can help them build a more global company.

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