VR Therapy App Tripp Raises $11M From Amazon, Niantic
Courtesy of TRIPP

VR Therapy App Tripp Raises $11M From Amazon, Niantic

Tripp, the virtual reality meditation startup that simulates psychedelic experiences, has raised $11.2 million in new Series A funding, the Los Angeles-based company announced Wednesday.

San Francisco-based BITKRAFT Ventures led the round and was joined by the Amazon Alexa Fund, Qualcomm, HTC, “Pokémon Go” developer Niantic and existing investor Mayfield. The new funding is an extension on Tripp’s initial $11 million Series A round last year and brings the startup’s total capital raised to more than $26 million.


Tripp also used the opportunity to unveil its acquisition of Eden, a VR-based world-building platform and online social hub created by video game developer Bearded Eye. It’s the latest in a series of acquisitions for the deal-happy Tripp, which in February scooped up EvolVR, a VR platform that allows people to meditate together via virtual avatars.

“Eden allows us to create and develop more premium live programming as we scale our growing mindfulness community,” Tripp co-founder Nanea Reeves said in an email to dot.LA. “Eventually, you will see Eden expand towards allowing our community members to offer their own experiences to the community.”

Tripp launched in 2018 as a VR platform that allowed people to meditate while looking at psychedelic, “Alice in Wonderland”-esque visuals like pulsating trees and rippling sand dunes. In the years since, the company has made its foray into the world of virtual, communal meditation; in November, it announced a partnership with Niantic to expand its platform via augmented reality (AR) offerings where people can interact and meditate together.

“Our main focus is currently on scaling our consumer offering at this stage in our company life cycle, but we have ongoing research initiatives in the categories of substance use disorder, anxiety reduction, PTSD and ADHD,” Reeves said in an email. “Early results are very promising, and I believe that digital therapeutics will be a big future opportunity for us that will greatly benefit from the cross-platform metaverse distribution footprint that we are continuing to build out now.”

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Ben Bergman is the newsroom's senior finance reporter. Previously he was a senior business reporter and host at KPCC, a senior producer at Gimlet Media, a producer at NPR's Morning Edition, and produced two investigative documentaries for KCET. He has been a frequent on-air contributor to business coverage on NPR and Marketplace and has written for The New York Times and Columbia Journalism Review. Ben was a 2017-2018 Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economic and Business Journalism at Columbia Business School. In his free time, he enjoys skiing, playing poker, and cheering on The Seattle Seahawks.

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