Virtual HR Platform Talespin Gets a Boost in the Remote Work Era

Decerry Donato

Decerry Donato is a reporter at dot.LA. Prior to that, she was an editorial fellow at the company. Decerry received her bachelor's degree in literary journalism from the University of California, Irvine. She continues to write stories to inform the community about issues or events that take place in the L.A. area. On the weekends, she can be found hiking in the Angeles National forest or sifting through racks at your local thrift store.

Promotional image of Talespin's VR Employee Training Program.
Courtesy of Talespin
Talespin, a Culver City-based startup that deploys virtual reality to help companies train their employees, has raised $20 million in fresh funding, it announced Thursday.

The Series C funding round was co-led by Australia-based SEEK Investments and Los Angeles-based Allomer Capital. Pearson Ventures, Accenture Ventures, Go1 and Sony Innovation Fund also participated in the round.

Founded in 2015, Talespin’s platform allows employers to create a variety of virtual workplace training scenarios—using 3D virtual humans to help employees practice conversational skills and simulate tasks. The company went viral several years ago thanks to a virtual demo that depicted the firing of a worker named Barry.

The platform has only grown more viable amid a post-pandemic shift to remote work that has forced companies to increasingly digitize their operations. Talespin counts Accenture, AIA and Farmers Insurance among its customers.

The startup’s technology has also grown in relevance with the emergence of the metaverse, which has prompted organizations to more seriously explore virtual means of conducting business.

“Our new funding and investor relationships will help us further scale this platform, and realize our broader company vision for learning in the metaverse,” Talespin co-founder and CEO Kyle Jackson said in a statement.

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