Rivian Banking on Solar Energy To Power Its EV Chargers

Rivian Banking on Solar Energy To Power Its EV Chargers

Electric truck and SUV manufacturer Rivian has entered an agreement with solar energy company Clearloop to finance a Tennessee solar facility that will help power its EV chargers in the region. Axios first reported the news Thursday.

The Irvine-based automaker provided upfront financing for one megawatt of renewable electricity at the Paris Solar Farm in Puryear, Tenn., about 100 miles west of Nashville. The solar farm broke ground on Tuesday; once completed, it will produce 6.75 megawatts of energy annually.


Rivian’s one megawatt investment will power its Rivian Waypoint chargers located in Tennessee state parks, among "other clean energy commitments in the region," it said in a press release. Power production startup Silicon Ranch, which acquired Clearloop last year, will build the solar farm. Tennessee utility Paris BPU, a partner in the Puryear solar farm, will oversee operations.

The partnership comes as Rivian has struggled to meet production targets, while CEO RJ Scaringe recently predicted a major electric vehicle battery shortage in the coming years. Rivian is also facing pushback on recent expansion plans after its $5 billion factory in Georgia was approved despite backlash from local communities. In recent months, the company has faced shareholder lawsuits over price increases to its vehicles and seen its stock tumble in the wake of its initial public offering last November.

Rivian joins a growing number of Southern California-based startups investing in solar power. Long Beach-based rocket maker Rocket Lab acquired New Mexico-based solar panel company SolAero last year, while Santa Monica-based B2U Storage Solutions plans to transform depleted electric vehicle batteries into solar power storage. In January, San Diego-based electric vehicle charging startup ChargeNet raised funds to bring solar-powered EV charging stations to fast-food parking lots.

Yet curbing enthusiasm about the alternative energy source is the Biden administration’s investigation into whether China circumvented tariffs on solar equipment imports to the U.S.—a probe that could hinder the domestic solar industry's ability to build projects.

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'We’re Running Out of Ore on Earth': Astroforge Targets April for Test Asteroid Refining Mission
Photo: Astroforge

One of the most-used elements in industrial work on Earth is disappearing.

Popular for industrial use because of its resistance to corrosion and heat, platinum sells for over $1,000 an ounce and is in everything from wedding bands to medical devices to a number of auto parts.

And retrieving what little of the element does remain, will only exacerbate the ongoing climate crisis – resource extraction was the source of half the world’s carbon emissions and 80% of its biodiversity loss in 2019 and that number has likely only risen.

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Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

https://twitter.com/samsonamore
samsonamore@dot.la
LA Tech Week: How These Six Greentech Startups Are Tackling Major Climate Issues
Samson Amore

At Lowercarbon Capital’s LA Tech Week event Thursday, the synergy between the region’s aerospace industry and greentech startups was clear.

The event sponsored by Lowercarbon, Climate Draft (and the defunct Silicon Valley Bank’s Climate Technology & Sustainability team) brought together a handful of local startups in Hawthorne not far from LAX, and many of the companies shared DNA with arguably the region’s most famous tech resident: SpaceX.

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Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

https://twitter.com/samsonamore
samsonamore@dot.la
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