Six New Coronavirus Cases in L.A. Venues, Schools Warned to Prep

Rachel Uranga

Rachel Uranga is dot.LA's Managing Editor, News. She is a former Mexico-based market correspondent at Reuters and has worked for several Southern California news outlets, including the Los Angeles Business Journal and the Los Angeles Daily News. She has covered everything from IPOs to immigration. Uranga is a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and California State University Northridge. A Los Angeles native, she lives with her husband, son and their felines.

Six New Coronavirus Cases in L.A. Venues, Schools Warned to Prep

Los Angeles County officials declared a health emergency Wednesday as they confirmed six new cases of coronavirus, and warned schools and business may need to be closed if COV1D-19 continues to spread.

"I want to reassure everyone, we are not there today," said L.A. County Department of Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer. "We don't have community transmission, that we know about."


All of the new cases were linked to someone who had recently traveled or been exposed to an infected person.

"We have asked (venues) to make sure that they too are well prepared, and that they're making it easy for people to practice our public health hygiene," Ferrer said during a Wednesday morning news conference.

In the meantime, health officials asked people to stay six feet away from others, frequently wash their hands, and avoid handshakes and hugs.

A family physician posted at the Montgomery Summit, where about 1,000 are expected to come for an intense two-day summit of top-flight investors and entrepreneurs, was not aware that officials were issuing new guidance. Dr. Myron Shapero fielded a handful of calls from attendees, but the announcement hasn't changed his view that the conference should go on. "Everyone has to be on guard, washing their hands and if you are sick stay away and see your doctor," he said. But he said, the idea that people can stay six feet away from others is "impossible to accomplish."

Officials will be releasing updated information on how schools and businesses can prevent the spread of the fast-moving virus, but they warned if COVID-19 spreads it could force large gatherings to be shut down,

"If at any point, we think that there's good reason for us to be worried about extensive community transmission, (venues) have been alerted to the possibility that we may ask for modifications at large public events," she said. "This could be that games are played but there are no spectators. This could be that there are limits to how people are going to gather at public events,"

Jamie Montgomery, whose March Capital holds the summit in Santa Monica, could not be reached for comment on Wednesday morning. But Montgomery told dot.LA Monday that he struggled with the decision over whether to move forward as other companies were shutting down their conferences.

Facebook yanked its annual F8 developer meeting in May, the Game Developers Conference scheduled in San Francisco for later this month was canceled, and the YPO Edge summit planned for March was dropped.

In Italy, where there has been an outbreak of coronavirus officials soccer matches have been played in empty fields and officials are closing schools.

So far, there have been 92,000 cases of the virus and 3,100 deaths worldwide.

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Energy Shares Gears Up To Bring Equity Crowdfunding to Retail Investors

David Shultz

David Shultz reports on clean technology and electric vehicles, among other industries, for dot.LA. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, Outside, Nautilus and many other publications.

Energy Shares Gears Up To Bring Equity Crowdfunding to Retail Investors
Photo by Red Zeppelin on Unsplash

The Inflation Reduction Act contains almost $400 billion in funding for clean energy initiatives. There’s $250 billion for energy projects. $23 billion for transportation and EVs. $46 billion for environment. $21 billion for agriculture, and so on. With so much cash flowing into the sector, the possibilities for investment and growth are gigantic.

These investment opportunities, however, have typically been inaccessible for everyday retail investors until much later in a company’s development–after an IPO, usually. Meaning that the best returns are likely to be captured by banks and other institutions who have the capital and financing to invest large sums of money earlier in the process.

That’s where Pasadena-based Energy Shares comes in. The company wants to help democratize access to these investment opportunities and simultaneously give early-stage utility-scale energy projects another revenue stream.

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Why These Ukrainian Entrepreneurs Are Making LA Their Home

Aisha Counts
Aisha Counts is a business reporter covering the technology industry. She has written extensively about tech giants, emerging technologies, startups and venture capital. Before becoming a journalist she spent several years as a management consultant at Ernst & Young.
Why These Ukrainian Entrepreneurs Are Making LA Their Home
Joey Mota

Fleeing war and chasing new opportunities, more than a dozen Ukrainian entrepreneurs have landed in Los Angeles, finding an unexpected community in the city of dreams. These entrepreneurs have started companies that are collectively worth more than $300 million, in industries ranging from electric vehicle charging stations to audience monetization platforms to social networks.

Dot.LA spent an evening with this group of Ukrainian citizens, learning what it was like to build startups in Ukraine, to cope with the unimaginable fear of fleeing war, and to garner the resilience to rebuild.

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