LA Venture Podcast: 2020 Highlights

When we started this podcast, people asked if we'd run out of guests after a year of weekly episodes with Los Angeles VCs. Not even close. For this week's episode of L.A. Venture, we hope you enjoy a few highlights from the show.


Hear from:

  • Kara Nortman
  • Deb Benton
  • Mark Suster
  • Peter Lee
  • Scott Stanford
  • Alex Gurevich
  • Eric Pakravan
  • Jesse Draper
  • Courtney Reum
  • Arjan Schutte
  • Michael Tam
  • Dana Settle
  • Marcos Gonzalez

Want to hear more of L.A. Venture? Listen on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

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Streaming is sidelining TV pilots. That's one of the findings in a pair of new reports released Wednesday by the nonprofit that manages most of L.A. County's film-permitting process.

The reports document the pandemic and how the rise in streaming services is changing the film-production world and challenging California's place in it.

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Forty-five minutes in traffic won't get you very far in Los Angeles. But Virgin Hyperloop estimates it will be able to get you from Los Angeles to San Francisco in that time.

The Richard Branson-owned company unveiled its hyperloop concept video Wednesday, just two months after the company's first tested its design with passengers. Traveling several hundred miles per hour in a pressurized tube is no longer a vision of the far-distant future — Virgin Hyperloop engineers want to make it a reality in less than 10 years.

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Bracket Capital, a Beverly Hills-based investment management firm focused on acquiring secondary shares in later-stage tech companies like SpaceX and Bird, announced Wednesday it has raised nearly half a billion dollars in equity.

The firm will split the cash between two funds, a traditional $150 million fund and another $350 million one that will co-invest alongside other firms.

Rather than buying stakes directly in startups, the firm said 80% of its shares come from snapping up existing shares. Those often come from early employees – tired of waiting for their company to go public – who are looking to cash out some of their equity so they can buy a house or pay for tuition.

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