Karma Prices Its Electric Car at $80K to Compete With Tesla’s Model S

Karma Prices Its Electric Car at $80K to Compete With Tesla’s Model S

Luxury electric vehicle-maker Karma Automotive announced pricing for its first all-electric car will start at $79,900, as the company prepares to take on Tesla and break out in the burgeoning upscale electric vehicle market.

The car can be reserved for a fully-refundable $100 deposit on their website. The design for the Karma GSe Series sedan has yet to be released but the company said it would retain the low-slung sporty profile of the company's signature car, the Revero GT, with a powertrain configuration, 21-inch wheels and vegan leather interior standard. Karma said its range will be "north of 300 miles."


It's set to roll out next year as competition in the electric vehicle market heats up. Earlier this week, Silicon Valley-based Lucid announced their car, Lucid Air, is slated for 2021 and will start at $77,400. That prompted Tesla CEO Elon Musk to announce a price drop for the Model S.

Tesla has dominated the market but a slew of new electric vehicles are set to come on line that could challenge the carmaker's position. Karma told dot.LA earlier this year it is talks with investment banks to help it go public. The company sought to bring down prices so it can have a broader market appeal.

With production facilities in Moreno Valley, Karma is the only U.S.-based electric vehicle startup that is producing and selling vehicles other than Tesla. Last year it rolled out about 550 of its Revero GT, an ultra luxury electric vehicle that starts around $135,000.

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