Bored Ape Yacht Club Co-Founder And Whatnot Co-Founders Buy New Homes In LA

Kristin Snyder

Kristin Snyder is an editorial intern for dot.la. She previously interned with Tiger Oak Media and led the arts section for UCLA's Daily Bruin.

Bored Ape Yacht Club Co-Founder And Whatnot Co-Founders Buy New Homes In LA
Photo by Venti Views on Unsplash

Tech founders are dropping big sums on Los Angeles homes.

Bored Ape Yacht Club co-founder Zeshan Ali purchased a 2,000-square feet Silver Lake house for $4 million. Ali, who previously lived in St. Louis, Missouri, rose to prominence after the once-secret creatives behind the NFT company were revealed earlier this year.


Even as the crypto market fluctuates, BAYC has expanded to celebrity videos and broken into Hollywood. Yuga Labs, the company behind BAYC, boasts a $4 billion valuation.

Patreon CEO and co-founder also Jack Conte also resides in Silver Lake, as does YouTuber Jenn Im.

Other tech figures are also snapping up real estate in the city. Logan Head and Grant LaFontaine, the founders of the LA-based livestream shopping platform Whatnot, dropped $15 million on a new house in Beverly Hills. The pair sold a four-bedroom Venice house for $3.7 million in August.

In July, Whatnot brought in $260 million in Series D funding. Livestream shopping has taken off in Asia, and American markets have been trying to recreate that success. Whatnot is cornering this market, with a $3.7 billion valuation. Competitors like Popshop Live and Talkshoplive are seeing mixed results as the trend struggles to take off in the U.S.

Head and LaFontaine join Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and tech entrepreneur Milun Tesovic in Beverly Hills. Last week, Bezos’ ex-wife Mackenzie Scott donated her $55 million home in the area to charity. The luxurious zip code is also home to Launch House, a mansion for startup founders facing accusations of misconduct and harassment.

Throughout the pandemic, some experts believed a number of tech founders and companies would lead a great exodus out of California. Some did leave—most notably, Elon Musk relocated Tesla to Texas, though SpaceX remains situated in Hawthorne. But many tech founders aren’t leaving Los Angeles, and the city continues to attract venture capital firms and startups.

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Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

When avatar startup Genies raised $150 million in April, the company released an unusual message to the public: “Farewell.”

The Marina del Rey-based unicorn, which makes cartoon-like avatars for celebrities and aims to “build an avatar for every single person on Earth,” didn’t go under. Rather, Genies announced it would stay quiet for a while to focus on building avatar-creation products.

Genies representatives told dot.LA that the firm is now seeking more creators to try its creation tools for 3D avatars, digital fashion items and virtual experiences. On Thursday, the startup launched a three-week program called DIY Collective, which will mentor and financially support up-and-coming creatives.

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Here's What To Expect At LA Tech Week

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Here's What To Expect At LA Tech Week

LA Tech Week—a weeklong showcase of the region’s growing startup ecosystem—is coming this August.

The seven-day series of events, from Aug. 15 through Aug. 21, is a chance for the Los Angeles startup community to network, share insights and pitch themselves to investors. It comes a year after hundreds of people gathered for a similar event that allowed the L.A. tech community—often in the shadow of Silicon Valley—to flex its muscles.

From fireside chats with prominent founders to a panel on aerospace, here are some highlights from the roughly 30 events happening during LA Tech Week, including one hosted by dot.LA.

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AmazeVR Wants You To Attend K-Pop Concerts Virtually

Kristin Snyder

Kristin Snyder is an editorial intern for dot.la. She previously interned with Tiger Oak Media and led the arts section for UCLA's Daily Bruin.

AmazeVR Wants You To Attend K-Pop Concerts Virtually
Photo courtesy of AmazeVR

Virtual reality startup AmazeVR now has $17 million to further expand its VR concert experience.

The West Hollywood-based company’s latest funding amounts to a bet that virtual shows, a staple of the pandemic, are here to stay. Mirae Asset Capital led the Series B funding round, with Mirae Asset Financial Group subsidiary (Mirae Asset Venture Investment), CJ Investment, Smilegate Investment, GS Futures and LG Technology Ventures investing again. Mobile game maker Krafton joined the group—but South Korean entertainment company CJ ENM’s stake reveals AmazeVR’s plans to expand into K-pop world.

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