Why Did Quibi Fail?

Kelly O'Grady
Kelly O'Grady is dot.LA's chief host & correspondent. Kelly serves as dot.LA's on-air talent, and is responsible for designing and executing all video efforts. A former management consultant for McKinsey, and TV reporter for NESN, she also served on Disney's Corporate Strategy team, focusing on M&A and the company's direct-to-consumer streaming efforts. Kelly holds a bachelor's degree from Harvard College and an MBA from Harvard Business School. A Boston native, Kelly spent a year as Miss Massachusetts USA, and can be found supporting her beloved Patriots every Sunday come football season.
Why Did Quibi Fail?

Quibi was one of the buzziest startups of 2020. It raised $1.75 billion and had lined up A-list actors and producers for its content. The short-form streamer was the brainchild of storied executives Jeff Katzenberg and Meg Whitman. So why did it fail so quickly? On this installment from our new "dot.LA Explains" series, host Kelly O'Grady goes through five reasons experts say Quibi failed.


Key takeaways:

  • Consumer demand for highly produced short-form content is slim
  • Launching during the pandemic was terrible timing
  • Celebrity driven content did not resonate with audiences
  • Quibi lacked a breakout hit show
  • The inability to share content on social media hurt Quibi's potential to create buzz


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