Pandemic, Strained U.S. China Relations Force Investors to Pivot

Pandemic, Strained U.S. China Relations Force Investors to Pivot

Tensions between the U.S. and China — the world's two largest economies — and the pandemic are making U.S. investors rethink supply chains once largely dependent on Asia.

That's one of the takeaways from a virtual panel hosted Thursday by the Asia Society Southern California and dot.LA on venture capital in Southern California and Asia.


"Only 63% of U.S. manufacturing is fully utilized," said Eric Manlunas, founder and managing partner of Wavemaker Partners. His firm has recently invested in companies that are helping bring manufacturing back to the United States, after years of offshoring.

Especially during the pandemic, many want to become less reliant on Asian supply chains, he said. "All the saber-rattling Trump has done has created some need for some of these large product suppliers and manufacturers to start looking into on-shoring a lot to the U.S."

Investors are closely watching the strained trade relations between the U.S. and China, from the Trump Administration's ban on TikTok to the recent export restrictions targeting state-owned enterprises.

Many are betting tensions will all blow over soon and not have an overall chilling effect.

"This will subside. Americans have very, very shallow memories and this will be forgotten pretty quickly," Manlunas said.

Chinese investment has flourished in Los Angeles. Companies like Baidu, Tencent, Alibaba and Wanda Group are putting money behind startups that want a toehold in the Asian market.

Wavemaker Partners, co-headquartered in Santa Monica and Singapore, announced last month it would close its third and largest fund focused on Southeast Asia.

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Minnie Ingersoll is a partner at TenOneTen and host of the LA Venture podcast. Prior to TenOneTen, Minnie was the COO and co-founder of $100M+ Shift.com, an online marketplace for used cars. Minnie started her career as an early product manager at Google. Minnie studied Computer Science at Stanford and has an MBA from HBS. She recently moved back to L.A. after 20+ years in the Bay Area and is excited to be a part of the growing tech ecosystem of Southern California. In her space time, Minnie surfs baby waves and raises baby people.

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