Knowledge Creator Platform Kajabi Raids TikTok for New President

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Kajabi President and Chief Product Officer ​Sean Kim
Image Courtesy of Kajabi
  • The Irvine-based startup has lured TikTok’s head of product, Sean Kim, as it looks to grow its content platform for “knowledge economy” entrepreneurs.

Kajabi, a platform for “knowledge economy” entrepreneurs and content creators, has looked to the most influential influencer platform of all for a new leader.


Irvine-based Kajabi has hired former TikTok executive Sean Kim as its president and chief product officer, the company announced Wednesday. Kim served as head of product at Tiktok as the Culver City-based social media giant became the most visited website on the internet, with over 1 billion monthly active users. He now joins Kajabi, which raised $550 million last year to grow a content platform that allows entrepreneurs, coaches and influencers to build online courses, newsletters and membership websites.

“For me, it was like jumping off one rocket ship onto another,” Kim, who started in his new role on Monday, told dot.LA.

Kim joined TikTok in September 2019 and helped launch initiatives like its Creator Fund and features like Stitch, which allows users to attach part of someone else’s video to their own. More recently, he oversaw the development of TikTok’s new smart TV app. Prior to joining TikTok, Kim was the global head of product at Amazon Prime.

While he described TikTok as an “incredible” company, Kim called Kajabi an “amazing opportunity” to build new products and scale the business globally. He’s the second TikTok executive to depart the company in recent weeks, after it reportedly ousted marketing chief Nick Tran. The timing is coincidental, Kim said.

“Sometimes in life you're presented with an amazing opportunity, and the timing is just right,” he said.

Founded in 2010, Kajabi sells a subscription software service for people who want to monetize their expertise—offering tools to publish, market and sell digital products like newsletters and podcasts. The company, which charges users a monthly fee, says it has helped its customers generate $3 billion in sales from more than 60 million people globally. Creators on the platform have instructed on topics ranging from how to sleep-train babies to how to forage for mushrooms.

“You can think of it as a build-your-own, personalized MasterClass,” Kim said, referring to the online education subscription platform.

In a statement, Kajabi CEO Ahad Khan noted that Kim joins during a period of “rapid expansion [for] both our business and the knowledge economy.” The firm said it “significantly expanded” its customer base in 2021 and reached its highest-ever annual recurring revenue, while still remaining profitable. Kajabi declined to share its revenue or employment figures, but said its number of monthly transactions and average order values are growing. Its employee headcount is 2.5-times higher than in January 2020, according to a company spokesperson.

Investment giant Tiger Global led Kajabi’s $550 million funding round last May, which valued the company at more than $2 billion. Kajabi had previously secured an undisclosed minority investment from growth equity firm Spectrum Equity Partners in 2019—the first outside capital raised by the company since its inception.

Kim declined to share details on what he’ll be working on at Kajabi, but said the company is focused on building “some really great tools for knowledge creators.”

“They're leading the knowledge economy space,” Kim said of his new firm. “However, I saw that there's a huge opportunity for us to continually grow in the U.S. as well as globally, and this business model can ultimately apply to many types of creators.”

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Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

When avatar startup Genies raised $150 million in April, the company released an unusual message to the public: “Farewell.”

The Marina del Rey-based unicorn, which makes cartoon-like avatars for celebrities and aims to “build an avatar for every single person on Earth,” didn’t go under. Rather, Genies announced it would stay quiet for a while to focus on building avatar-creation products.

Genies representatives told dot.LA that the firm is now seeking more creators to try its creation tools for 3D avatars, digital fashion items and virtual experiences. On Thursday, the startup launched a three-week program called DIY Collective, which will mentor and financially support up-and-coming creatives.

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Here's What To Expect At LA Tech Week

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Here's What To Expect At LA Tech Week

LA Tech Week—a weeklong showcase of the region’s growing startup ecosystem—is coming this August.

The seven-day series of events, from Aug. 15 through Aug. 21, is a chance for the Los Angeles startup community to network, share insights and pitch themselves to investors. It comes a year after hundreds of people gathered for a similar event that allowed the L.A. tech community—often in the shadow of Silicon Valley—to flex its muscles.

From fireside chats with prominent founders to a panel on aerospace, here are some highlights from the roughly 30 events happening during LA Tech Week, including one hosted by dot.LA.

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Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College and previously covered technology and entertainment for TheWrap and reported on the SoCal startup scene for the Los Angeles Business Journal. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

​GrayMatter robotics working
Andria Moore courtesy of GrayMatter

GrayMatter Robotics, a startup based in Gardena (and definitely not a “Breaking Bad” reference, the founders assure us) is looking to disrupt the industrial finishing and sanding industry by programming robotic arms with artificial intelligence software to automate this labor.

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