2022 Will Be the Year Automation Changes Fast Food for Good
Bobacino robots are set for the food automation age.

2022 Will Be the Year Automation Changes Fast Food for Good

Restaurant innovation to improve customer convenience will continue to grow at a rapid pace around things like autonomous delivery vehicles, unmanned and automated 24/7 open food kiosks and app-based ordering and paying. Diners are embracing automation more than ever before and are open to change if it means added safety, convenience and efficiency, as well as consistency in the quality of food they receive.

The fast-food industry will stay afloat through increased automation to provide things customers demand like contactless pickup and low-touch food prep, as well as to combat labor shortages and increased labor costs. Back-of-house automation will become a necessity if restaurants are to survive the current market.

By replacing dangerous jobs and menial tasks with automation, fast-food companies will be able to free up workers and shift the focus back to customer service. By removing human error and improving safety and consistency, they‘ll be able to provide quality food to customers. By gaining actionable insight into operations and customer trends, these restaurants can improve and customize the consumer experience. And by optimizing to adapt to the changing footprint of restaurants and kitchens, they can shift focus to off-premise takeout and delivery, offering further flexibility and dramatically reducing overhead costs.

Tech-enabled solutions will not only improve the customer experience but will change the fast-food industry as we know it.

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Cadence

Pejman Nozad, a founding managing partner at Pear VC, joins this episode of LA Venture to discuss Pear VC's current initiatives, including its accelerator and fellowships. He's seen as one of the most successful angel investors in the area, and for good reason: he has made more than 300 investments in his lifetime.

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Minnie Ingersoll
Minnie Ingersoll is a partner at TenOneTen and host of the LA Venture podcast. Prior to TenOneTen, Minnie was the COO and co-founder of $100M+ Shift.com, an online marketplace for used cars. Minnie started her career as an early product manager at Google. Minnie studied Computer Science at Stanford and has an MBA from HBS. She recently moved back to L.A. after 20+ years in the Bay Area and is excited to be a part of the growing tech ecosystem of Southern California. In her space time, Minnie surfs baby waves and raises baby people.
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Ben Bergman

Ben Bergman is the newsroom's senior finance reporter. Previously he was a senior business reporter and host at KPCC, a senior producer at Gimlet Media, a producer at NPR's Morning Edition, and produced two investigative documentaries for KCET. He has been a frequent on-air contributor to business coverage on NPR and Marketplace and has written for The New York Times and Columbia Journalism Review. Ben was a 2017-2018 Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economic and Business Journalism at Columbia Business School. In his free time, he enjoys skiing, playing poker, and cheering on The Seattle Seahawks.

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ben@dot.la
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