2022 Will Be the Year Automation Changes Fast Food for Good

Buck Jordan
Buck Jordan is the founder and CEO of Wavemaker Labs.
2022 Will Be the Year Automation Changes Fast Food for Good
Bobacino robots are set for the food automation age.
Restaurant innovation to improve customer convenience will continue to grow at a rapid pace around things like autonomous delivery vehicles, unmanned and automated 24/7 open food kiosks and app-based ordering and paying. Diners are embracing automation more than ever before and are open to change if it means added safety, convenience and efficiency, as well as consistency in the quality of food they receive.

The fast-food industry will stay afloat through increased automation to provide things customers demand like contactless pickup and low-touch food prep, as well as to combat labor shortages and increased labor costs. Back-of-house automation will become a necessity if restaurants are to survive the current market.

By replacing dangerous jobs and menial tasks with automation, fast-food companies will be able to free up workers and shift the focus back to customer service. By removing human error and improving safety and consistency, they‘ll be able to provide quality food to customers. By gaining actionable insight into operations and customer trends, these restaurants can improve and customize the consumer experience. And by optimizing to adapt to the changing footprint of restaurants and kitchens, they can shift focus to off-premise takeout and delivery, offering further flexibility and dramatically reducing overhead costs.

Tech-enabled solutions will not only improve the customer experience but will change the fast-food industry as we know it.

Subscribe to our newsletter to catch every headline.

Cadence

Inspectiv Raises $8.6M To Build a Better Cybersecurity Platform

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He previously covered technology and entertainment for TheWrap and reported on the SoCal startup scene for the Los Angeles Business Journal. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter at @Samsonamore. Pronouns: he/him

Inspectiv Raises $8.6M To Build a Better Cybersecurity Platform
Art by NicoElNino/ Shutterstock

What do education startups, maternal care platforms and Minecraft servers have in common? They’re all susceptible to hacking.

Also, businesses in each industry use software created by Manhattan Beach-based Inspectiv, which announced Thursday that it’s raised an $8.6 million Series A round to continue developing its artificial intelligence that detects and wipes out security threats.

Read moreShow less
https://twitter.com/samsonamore
samsonamore@dot.la

Activision Buys Game Studio Proletariat To Expand ‘World of Warcraft’ Staff

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He previously covered technology and entertainment for TheWrap and reported on the SoCal startup scene for the Los Angeles Business Journal. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter at @Samsonamore. Pronouns: he/him

Xbox\u2019s various game developers it now owns: Activision, Blizzard and King.
Courtesy of Activision Blizzard

Activision Blizzard intends to acquire Proletariat, a Boston-based game studio that developed the wizard-themed battle royale game “Spellbreak.”

Read moreShow less
https://twitter.com/samsonamore
samsonamore@dot.la
RELATEDEDITOR'S PICKS
LA TECH JOBS
interchangeLA
Trending