There's a Seven-Story Tall Statue of Elon Musk in Tulsa (Really)

There's a Seven-Story Tall Statue of Elon Musk in Tulsa (Really)

Elon Musk is back in the news cycle, but this time it wasn't because of his tweets.

Tulsa has transformed its iconic 75-foot-tall Golden Driller statue into a likeness of the billionaire entrepreneur in an almost superhero-style pose with the Tesla emblem emblazoned across his chest. The city gave the statue, built in the 1960s as a tribute to the oil industry, a makeover to entice Musk to build a new factory in the Oklahoma metropolis.


Musk is reportedly considering both Tulsa and Austin as locations to build the upcoming "Cybertruck" utility vehicle. The factory could produce as many as 10,000 jobs, and become the largest employer in Tulsa, reported the Tulsa World. And, given that Musk is a frequent user of Twitter, the city's politicians have taken to social media to call attention to the statue as a way to entice Musk into building a plant there.


No word on if Musk has seen the publicity campaign.

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