How SoCal Edison Plans to Build 38,000 EV Chargers Across Southern California

Zac Estrada

Zac Estrada is a reporter covering transportation, technology and policy. A former reporter for The Verge and Jalopnik, his work has also appeared in Automobile Magazine, Autoweek, Pacific Standard, Boston.com and BLAC Detroit. A native of Southern California, he is a graduate of Northeastern University in Boston. You can find him on Twitter at @zacestrada.

How SoCal Edison Plans to Build 38,000 EV Chargers Across Southern California

Charging an electric car should soon get a bit easier in Southern California.

The region's largest power utility announced that it plans to install 38,000 electric vehicle chargers in the next five years as the state looks to ban most gas-powered car sales by 2035.


Southern California Edison (SCE), which provides electricity for most of Los Angeles County outside of the city of Los Angeles, announced Monday that it's putting down $436 million to build a network of chargers at businesses, schools, government agencies and apartment buildings.

Billed by SCE as the largest EV charging program run by a private utility company in the U.S., the company will offer qualifying customers installation and maintenance of the chargers. Customers must pay for the installation up front, but can apply for a rebate through the program.

Various companies are scrambling to identify areas that need more charging infrastructure to support the anticipated surge in electric vehicles over the next few years. Electric cars account for about 1% of cars on U.S. roads today, but environmental and government pressure means millions more are expected to be sold by the end of the decade.

SCE's Charge Ready program will have an added emphasis on putting charging stations in multifamily dwellings, such as this Charge Ready pilot project at a condominium complex in the South Bay area.

Many automakers rolling out new EVs anticipate owners will charge their vehicles at home most of the time. But charging station companies and electricity providers predict there will be consistent demand for charging in areas such as parking structures, public lots and shopping malls — especially for people who live in multi-unit buildings without off-street parking or in developments that make installing home chargers difficult.

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the city of Los Angeles' utility service, has installed chargers on street lamp posts near curbside parking, which goes with its incentives for low-income households to adopt EVs. Cities served by SCE, such as Santa Monica, have taken their own initiatives to install more public charging, and some automakers also offer customers discounts for Level 2 home chargers or prepaid cards for public stations operated by certain customers such as EVgo or ChargePoint.

SCE's program, called Charge Ready, builds on a pilot program started in the city of Lynwood four years ago with six chargers for government vehicles. It was later expanded with eight public charging stations at locations that include City Hall. Projects — including 200 public chargers at the Fairplex in Pomona and more than 100 throughout the city of Long Beach — were also funded through the SCE pilot program.

SCE also offers a $1,000 rebate for the purchase of a used EV.

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Regard Raises $15M for AI-Powered Software That Help Doctors Diagnose Patients

Decerry Donato

Decerry Donato is dot.LA's Editorial Fellow. Prior to that, she was an editorial intern at the company. Decerry received her bachelor's degree in literary journalism from the University of California, Irvine. She continues to write stories to inform the community about issues or events that take place in the L.A. area. On the weekends, she can be found hiking in the Angeles National forest or sifting through racks at your local thrift store.

Regard Raises $15M for AI-Powered Software That Help Doctors Diagnose Patients
Courtesy of Regard

Culver City-based health care startup Regard, which uses AI-driven software to help physicians accurately diagnose patients, has raised $15.3 million in Series A funding.

Pasadena-based Calibrate Ventures and Colorado-based Foundry Group led the investment in Regard, formerly known as HealthTensor. Other investors that participated in the round include TenOneTen Ventures, Susa Ventures, Brook Byers of Byers Capital and Dropbox CEO Drew Houston. The new funding will be used to grow Regard’s team and customer base, the company said in a press release.

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This Week in 'Raises': Regard Secures $15M, MaC Venture Capital Raises $203M for Second Fund

Decerry Donato

Decerry Donato is dot.LA's Editorial Fellow. Prior to that, she was an editorial intern at the company. Decerry received her bachelor's degree in literary journalism from the University of California, Irvine. She continues to write stories to inform the community about issues or events that take place in the L.A. area. On the weekends, she can be found hiking in the Angeles National forest or sifting through racks at your local thrift store.

This Week in 'Raises': Regard Secures $15M, MaC Venture Capital Raises $203M for Second Fund
Image by Joshua Letona

This week in “Raises”: A local healthcare startup secured funding to help grow the team and deploy its software to more physicians and hospitals, while Black-led, seed-stage venture capital firm surpassed its goal for its second fund.

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Braid Theory's Plan to Foster the Next Generation of Ocean Tech Startups

Keerthi Vedantam

Keerthi Vedantam is a bioscience reporter at dot.LA. She cut her teeth covering everything from cloud computing to 5G in San Francisco and Seattle. Before she covered tech, Keerthi reported on tribal lands and congressional policy in Washington, D.C. Connect with her on Twitter, Clubhouse (@keerthivedantam) or Signal at 408-470-0776.

Braid Theory's Plan to Foster the Next Generation of Ocean Tech Startups
Photo courtesy of the Port of Los Angeles.

San Pedro-based Braid Theory is one of the growing number of accelerators in the country looking to grow the so-called blue economy, which spans a range of ocean-related industries and is estimated at $2.5 trillion a year.

The accelerator is accepting online applications until July 18, with its second-ever program kicking off in August.

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