Netflix Buys Its Third Gaming Studio in Six Months

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College and previously covered technology and entertainment for TheWrap and reported on the SoCal startup scene for the Los Angeles Business Journal. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

A still from one of Boss Fight Entertainment’s games.​
Netflix/BossFight

Netflix is continuing its expansion into the world of gaming with the acquisition of yet another mobile game developer, Boss Fight Entertainment.

On Thursday, the streaming giant announced it is buying Texas-based Boss Fight as it looks to “build out our in-house creative development team” on the gaming side. Financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed.


The deal, Netflix’s third acquisition of a gaming studio in roughly six months, is part of the company’s push into the gaming market. After acquiring Glendale-based Night School last September, Netflix picked up Finnish mobile gaming company Next Games for $72 million earlier this month.

A gif of Netflix Games and Boss Fight Entertainment\u2019s new partnership.Courtesy of A gif of Netflix Games and Boss Fight Entertainment’s new partnership.Netflix/BossFight

So far, Netflix’s priority has been capitalizing on the mobile gaming market, which is now one of the fastest-growing segments of video gaming. The company has now released 16 titles since launching mobile games in November—including titles that use intellectual property from Netflix original series like “Stranger Things”—and plans to drop its first-ever first-person shooter game by the end of this month

“We’re still in the early days of building great game experiences,” Netflix vice president of game studios Amir Rahimi said in a statement Thursday. “Through partnerships with developers around the world, hiring top talent and acquisitions like [Boss Fight], we hope to build a world-class games studio capable of bringing a wide variety of delightful and deeply engaging original games—with no ads and no in-app purchases—to our hundreds of millions of members around the world.”

Subscribe to our newsletter to catch every headline.

Cadence

Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

When avatar startup Genies raised $150 million in April, the company released an unusual message to the public: “Farewell.”

The Marina del Rey-based unicorn, which makes cartoon-like avatars for celebrities and aims to “build an avatar for every single person on Earth,” didn’t go under. Rather, Genies announced it would stay quiet for a while to focus on building avatar-creation products.

Genies representatives told dot.LA that the firm is now seeking more creators to try its creation tools for 3D avatars, digital fashion items and virtual experiences. On Thursday, the startup launched a three-week program called DIY Collective, which will mentor and financially support up-and-coming creatives.

Read moreShow less

Here's What To Expect At LA Tech Week

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Here's What To Expect At LA Tech Week

LA Tech Week—a weeklong showcase of the region’s growing startup ecosystem—is coming this August.

The seven-day series of events, from Aug. 15 through Aug. 21, is a chance for the Los Angeles startup community to network, share insights and pitch themselves to investors. It comes a year after hundreds of people gathered for a similar event that allowed the L.A. tech community—often in the shadow of Silicon Valley—to flex its muscles.

From fireside chats with prominent founders to a panel on aerospace, here are some highlights from the roughly 30 events happening during LA Tech Week, including one hosted by dot.LA.

Read moreShow less

GrayMatter Is Building Industrial Robots To Take Over the Jobs Humans Hate

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College and previously covered technology and entertainment for TheWrap and reported on the SoCal startup scene for the Los Angeles Business Journal. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

​GrayMatter robotics working
Andria Moore courtesy of GrayMatter

GrayMatter Robotics, a startup based in Gardena (and definitely not a “Breaking Bad” reference, the founders assure us) is looking to disrupt the industrial finishing and sanding industry by programming robotic arms with artificial intelligence software to automate this labor.

Read moreShow less
RELATEDEDITOR'S PICKS
LA TECH JOBS
interchangeLA
Trending