National Lampoon to Turn IP into NFTs

Kristin Snyder

Kristin Snyder is dot.LA's 2022/23 Editorial Fellow. She previously interned with Tiger Oak Media and led the arts section for UCLA's Daily Bruin.

Neon-pink, one eyed monster being poked in the face with a banana.
Courtest of Non-Fungible Films

National Lampoon is in on the joke—this time, it's NFTs.

The comedy and entertainment company is the latest to explore NFTs. Partnering with Los Angeles-based Non-Fungible Films, the Lampoon will transform its IP—which includes films like “Animal House” and “Vacation”—into exclusive Web3 offerings. The first project will include commemorative art available via Non-Fungible Films’ “executive producer” pass.


Evolving from its origins as a comedy magazine, National Lampoon made a name for itself by licensing its brand for films, eventually producing its own titles. The company has also faced a number of scandals, including two former CEOs who were sentenced to prison—one of them charged with trying to orchestrate a stock increase for the company.

Based in Los Angeles, Non-Fungible Films is developing a Bored Ape Yacht Club TV series—one of many Bored Ape media projects—and films and games based around the characters in “Oscar Haley and The Great Beyond.”

“We could not think of a better production partner to incubate and create Web3 IP with than Non-Fungible Films,” Raj Singh, a National Lampoon board member, said in a statement. “Their passionate and loyal fans are a natural fit, and those who have grown up with our brand are ready for a disruptive NFT experience.”

Hollywood is betting on crypto as entertainment studios like ViacomCBS and Warner Bros. repurpose their IP as NFTs. United Talent Agency takes on crypto characters as clients, while major stars like Anthony Hopkins are starring in NFT films.

But as creatives deals with NFT theft and scams, a consumer watchdog group reminded 17 celebrities who did not disclose their material connections to NFTs they promoted. The question of IP ownership has also been hazy, with Miramax suing director Quentin Tarantino over his “Pulp Fiction” screenplay NFT.
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