Family of Former Activision Employee Drops Wrongful Death Lawsuit

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He previously covered technology and entertainment for TheWrap and reported on the SoCal startup scene for the Los Angeles Business Journal. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter at @Samsonamore. Pronouns: he/him

Family of Former Activision Employee Drops Wrongful Death Lawsuit
Activision Blizzard Logo Under Microscope

The family of Kerri Moynihan, an Activision Blizzard employee who died by suicide during a company retreat in 2017, have reportedly dropped their wrongful death lawsuit against the Santa Monica-based video game publisher.


Paul and Janet Moynihan originally sued Activision in March, alleging that sexual harassment their daughter experienced at work was a “significant factor” in her death. The Moynihans subsequently requested to drop the lawsuit on May 6, Axios reported on Tuesday, and asked that it be dismissed “with prejudice,” meaning that they can’t sue again.

Attorneys at Los Angeles-based firm Isaacs Friedberg, which represented the Moynihan family, and representatives for Activision did not immediately return requests for comment.

Kerri Moynihan was found dead in her Disneyland hotel room during an Activision company retreat in April 2017. The former finance manager was 32 years old.

Moynihan’s experiences at Activision were referenced in the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing’s ongoing workplace harassment lawsuit against Activision, though she was not named in the DFEH’s complaint last July. Both the state’s complaint and the Moynihan family’s lawsuit alleged that she was the subject of sexual harassment at work, including having pictures of her genitalia passed around by co-workers at a company holiday party in December 2016.

The Moynihan family’s lawsuit also alleged that Kerri had a sexual relationship with her boss, former Activision senior finance director Greg Restituito, and that Restituito lied to detectives investigating Moynihan’s death by failing to disclose their relationship.

The Moynihan family’s complaint was one of numerous sexual harassment lawsuits filed against Activision by current and former employees, who have alleged a workplace that was particularly toxic for women. Last fall, Activision CEO Bobby Kotick faced calls for his resignation from employees and shareholders after the Wall Street Journal reported that Kotick knew of alleged sexual assaults at the company but failed to inform Activision’s board. Activision has disputed the Journal’s reporting, claiming that there is “no evidence“ that senior executives including Kotick “ever intentionally ignored or attempted to downplay the instances of sexual harassment that occurred and were reported,“ the company said in a statement to dot.LA.

Activision is currently in the midst of being acquired by Microsoft in a deal valued at $69 billion. The transaction, which is pending regulatory approval, would be the gaming industry’s largest-ever merger.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at (800) 273-8255 or by texting HELLO to the Crisis Text Line at 741741.

Update, June 2: This story has been updated to include comment from Activision on the Wall Street Journal allegations against CEO Bobby Kotick.

Subscribe to our newsletter to catch every headline.

Cadence

Regard Raises $15M for AI-Powered Software That Help Doctors Diagnose Patients

Decerry Donato

Decerry Donato is dot.LA's Editorial Fellow. Prior to that, she was an editorial intern at the company. Decerry received her bachelor's degree in literary journalism from the University of California, Irvine. She continues to write stories to inform the community about issues or events that take place in the L.A. area. On the weekends, she can be found hiking in the Angeles National forest or sifting through racks at your local thrift store.

Regard Raises $15M for AI-Powered Software That Help Doctors Diagnose Patients
Courtesy of Regard

Culver City-based health care startup Regard, which uses AI-driven software to help physicians accurately diagnose patients, has raised $15.3 million in Series A funding.

Pasadena-based Calibrate Ventures and Colorado-based Foundry Group led the investment in Regard, formerly known as HealthTensor. Other investors that participated in the round include TenOneTen Ventures, Susa Ventures, Brook Byers of Byers Capital and Dropbox CEO Drew Houston. The new funding will be used to grow Regard’s team and customer base, the company said in a press release.

Read moreShow less

This Week in 'Raises': Regard Secures $15M, MaC Venture Capital Raises $203M for Second Fund

Decerry Donato

Decerry Donato is dot.LA's Editorial Fellow. Prior to that, she was an editorial intern at the company. Decerry received her bachelor's degree in literary journalism from the University of California, Irvine. She continues to write stories to inform the community about issues or events that take place in the L.A. area. On the weekends, she can be found hiking in the Angeles National forest or sifting through racks at your local thrift store.

This Week in 'Raises': Regard Secures $15M, MaC Venture Capital Raises $203M for Second Fund
Image by Joshua Letona

This week in “Raises”: A local healthcare startup secured funding to help grow the team and deploy its software to more physicians and hospitals, while Black-led, seed-stage venture capital firm surpassed its goal for its second fund.

Read moreShow less

How Braid Theory Plans to Build the Blue Economy from the Port of LA

Keerthi Vedantam

Keerthi Vedantam is a bioscience reporter at dot.LA. She cut her teeth covering everything from cloud computing to 5G in San Francisco and Seattle. Before she covered tech, Keerthi reported on tribal lands and congressional policy in Washington, D.C. Connect with her on Twitter, Clubhouse (@keerthivedantam) or Signal at 408-470-0776.

How Braid Theory Plans to Build the Blue Economy from the Port of LA
Photo courtesy of the Port of Los Angeles.

San Pedro-based Braid Theory is one of the growing number of accelerators in the country looking to grow the so-called blue economy, which spans a range of ocean-related industries and is estimated at $2.5 trillion a year.

The accelerator is accepting online applications until July 18, with its second-ever program kicking off in August.

Read moreShow less
RELATEDEDITOR'S PICKS
LA TECH JOBS
interchangeLA
Trending