Santa Monica-based Snap continues to grow its gaming operation, announcing two new leadership hires for the division on Thursday.

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Snap is looking for entrepreneurs for its fourth round of the Yellow Accelerator, a 14-week program for entrepreneurs to build their companies with $150K in investment.

Specifically, they're looking for startups and brands that are attempting to help consumers do one of four things, including express themselves, live in the moment, learn about the world and/or have fun together.

Created in 2018, the in-house accelerator program supports and invests in tech companies building creative products. Take Love Stories TV, the platform for wedding videos, which Yellow Accelerator manager Alexandra Levitt said grew its audience significantly through the Yellow program. That same year the company partnered with Snapchat's Discover to launch its show on the app.

"If you're building a pure technology program, there are a lot of amazing programs that can support you," Yellow director Mike Su said. Snap's program is focused more on startups that take a creative approach, he said. Companies within Yellow's ecosystem span industries from entertainment to commerce to tech. The accelerator is best suited to help companies at the intersection of these spaces.

Though it's not a requirement, about half the companies that complete the accelerator program end up integrating with Snap.

In July, Snap also introduced its Collabs program, designed specifically to help early-stage companies integrate with the social media app. The first class runs September 21 through December 18.

And come October, the company will launch a year-round program called Yellow Community to connect L.A. entrepreneurs through virtual events and, eventually, in-personal gatherings.

Sam Golbach and Colby Brock know firsthand that platforms can disappear overnight.

The two started making sketch videos on the now-defunct social video website Vine back in 2013 when "it was not cool at all" to do that sort of thing, they said. When Vine shut down in late 2016, they migrated to YouTube, and later to Instagram, Snapchat and TikTok.

"Ever since we started, Colby and I have said, 'We need to do this (other app)' or else we'll have to go back to Kansas and not be able to have this lifestyle'," Golbach said.

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