EV Giant Rivian Files Trademark to Produce Electric Bikes
Ray Bradbury's Former Home is Now a Rivian Hub. Is It the Future of Car Dealerships?

EV Giant Rivian Files Trademark to Produce Electric Bikes

After making waves with the biggest IPO of 2021, electric bikes could be next on the agenda for Amazon-backed electric automaker Rivian.

As eagle-eyed observers at Rivian Forums pointed out earlier this week, the Irvine-based company has filed a new trademark covering bicycles, electric bicycles and an array of related parts and components. The trademark application could indicate that Rivian is plotting a foray into the e-bike space; such a move would diversify its offerings with a product that would be cheaper to produce and purchase than the company’s SUVs and pickup trucks.


An e-bike would also help Rivian maintain a competitive edge in the electric micromobility market, which is becoming increasingly crowded among automakers. Other major car brands that have launched or are planning to launch e-bikes and electric scooters include Jeep, Ford, BMW, Porsche and Mercedes-Benz.

Rivian’s emergence in the rapidly expanding EV market led to its landmark IPO in November 2021, which saw the company’s market valuation exceed $100 billion at one point—making it worth more than legacy heavyweights General Motors and Ford. Rivian is the first company to produce an all-electric pickup truck, the R1T, beating out competitors including rival electric automaker Tesla. Rivian’s largest investor is Amazon, which aims to have 10,000 of the company’s electric delivery vehicles on the road by the end of 2022.

After raising more than $12 billion through its IPO, Rivian announced plans to build a new $5 billion factory in Georgia that would complement its current facility in Illinois and increase its production capabilities. On Monday, Rivian announced that it had failed to meet its 2021 vehicle production target; shares fell nearly 6% on the news.

Also on Monday, Rivian confirmed reports that Chief Operating Officer Rod Copes had stepped down from his role.

Subscribe to our newsletter to catch every headline.

Cadence

In this episode of LA Venture, Julie Wroblewski talks about starting Magnify Ventures and helping modern families.

Wroblewski worked with Melinda French Gates to start Pivotal Ventures. For Wroblewski, it was her dream job as she got to lead venture capital investment strategy for five years. One of the focus areas at Pivotal was around caregiving innovation and American family homes.

Read more Show less
Minnie Ingersoll
Minnie Ingersoll is a partner at TenOneTen and host of the LA Venture podcast. Prior to TenOneTen, Minnie was the COO and co-founder of $100M+ Shift.com, an online marketplace for used cars. Minnie started her career as an early product manager at Google. Minnie studied Computer Science at Stanford and has an MBA from HBS. She recently moved back to L.A. after 20+ years in the Bay Area and is excited to be a part of the growing tech ecosystem of Southern California. In her space time, Minnie surfs baby waves and raises baby people.

Pejman Nozad, a founding managing partner at Pear VC, joins this episode of LA Venture to discuss Pear VC's current initiatives, including its accelerator and fellowships. He's seen as one of the most successful angel investors in the area, and for good reason: he has made more than 300 investments in his lifetime.

Read more Show less
Minnie Ingersoll
Minnie Ingersoll is a partner at TenOneTen and host of the LA Venture podcast. Prior to TenOneTen, Minnie was the COO and co-founder of $100M+ Shift.com, an online marketplace for used cars. Minnie started her career as an early product manager at Google. Minnie studied Computer Science at Stanford and has an MBA from HBS. She recently moved back to L.A. after 20+ years in the Bay Area and is excited to be a part of the growing tech ecosystem of Southern California. In her space time, Minnie surfs baby waves and raises baby people.
RELATEDTRENDING
LA TECH JOBS
interchangeLA