Fifth Wall Closes Half-Billion Dollar Fund to Decarbonize Real Estate

David Shultz

David Shultz reports on clean technology and electric vehicles, among other industries, for dot.LA. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, Outside, Nautilus and many other publications.

Plant in a glass pot filled with coins instead of dirt

Fifth Wall, a Los Angeles-based venture capital group, has closed a half-billion-dollar fund to decarbonize the property industry. The new money brings the group’s total managed investments to just north of $3 billion. It will be used to “invest in anything and everything to decarbonize the real estate industry,” says Brendan Wallace, co-founder and managing partner at Fifth Wall.


The real estate industry is vast, and its contribution to climate change is well documented. A recent McKinsey study estimates “[r]eal estate drives approximately 39 percent of total global emissions.” Transportation, by comparison, is responsible for around 27%.

“It's the single biggest lever the world can turn on mitigating climate change,” says Wallace. “However, as a category, it's pretty systemically under-invested in from climate venture capital funds. “Only about 6%, historically, of climate venture capital has gone into real estate-related technologies.”

Fifth Wall wants to change that by bringing together some of the biggest real estate owners—names like Marriot, Hilton and British Land—and investing their money into technologies that will help decarbonize the industry.

Fifth Wall’s portfolio includes everything from companies that make more efficient HVAC motors to carbon negative cement. The group also has financial stakes in heat pump and green hydrogen companies. There’s software of all sorts to invest in: regulatory compliance, fintech and industrial internet of things (IoT) technology that can support a real estate and construction economy that tracks carbon.

Wallace says the sheer scope of the real estate market combined with new interest in climate conscious investments helped create a demand for new fintech products that can track emissions and provide financial products that bake carbon costs into savings. “The U.S. commercial and residential real estate market is bigger than the U.S. stock market. It's the single biggest capital market on Earth,” says Wallace. “The allocators to that market are overwhelmingly saying ‘We will preferentially deploy capital to low or no carbon footprint real estate.’ So THE cost of capital has dramatically changed for lower carbon footprint real estate.”

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Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

When avatar startup Genies raised $150 million in April, the company released an unusual message to the public: “Farewell.”

The Marina del Rey-based unicorn, which makes cartoon-like avatars for celebrities and aims to “build an avatar for every single person on Earth,” didn’t go under. Rather, Genies announced it would stay quiet for a while to focus on building avatar-creation products.

Genies representatives told dot.LA that the firm is now seeking more creators to try its creation tools for 3D avatars, digital fashion items and virtual experiences. On Thursday, the startup launched a three-week program called DIY Collective, which will mentor and financially support up-and-coming creatives.

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Here's What To Expect At LA Tech Week

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Here's What To Expect At LA Tech Week

LA Tech Week—a weeklong showcase of the region’s growing startup ecosystem—is coming this August.

The seven-day series of events, from Aug. 15 through Aug. 21, is a chance for the Los Angeles startup community to network, share insights and pitch themselves to investors. It comes a year after hundreds of people gathered for a similar event that allowed the L.A. tech community—often in the shadow of Silicon Valley—to flex its muscles.

From fireside chats with prominent founders to a panel on aerospace, here are some highlights from the roughly 30 events happening during LA Tech Week, including one hosted by dot.LA.

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LA Tech ‘Moves’: HyperDraft Taps LegalZoom Exec

Decerry Donato

Decerry Donato is a reporter at dot.LA. Prior to that, she was an editorial fellow at the company. Decerry received her bachelor's degree in literary journalism from the University of California, Irvine. She continues to write stories to inform the community about issues or events that take place in the L.A. area. On the weekends, she can be found hiking in the Angeles National forest or sifting through racks at your local thrift store.

LA Tech ‘Moves’: HyperDraft Taps LegalZoom Exec
Photo by James Opas | Modified by Joshua Letona

“Moves,” our roundup of job changes in L.A. tech, is presented by Interchange.LA, dot.LA's recruiting and career platform connecting Southern California's most exciting companies with top tech talent. Create a free Interchange.LA profile here—and if you're looking for ways to supercharge your recruiting efforts, find out more about Interchange.LA's white-glove recruiting service by emailing Sharmineh O’Farrill Lewis (sharmineh@dot.la). Please send job changes and personnel moves to moves@dot.la.

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