Office Hours Podcast: How Is It That Tech Markets Are Booming While The Economy Reels?

Office Hours Podcast: How Is It That Tech Markets Are Booming While The Economy Reels?

With so many people out of work, how is it the stock market is soaring?

To help make sense of it all, have a listen to my Office Hours podcast where I speak with John Scuorzo and Zaheed Kajani, both senior managing directors at Evercore, a global independent investment banking advisory firm.


We'll dive deep into the factors contributing to Wall Street's optimism, like, the enormous stimulus coming from governments, low interest rates, international investment and optimism for what cutbacks and introduction of new technology will mean for many companies' future profits.

This is an edited version of a webinar that took place on June 23, 2020.

Want more? Subscribe to Office Hours on Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, Spotify iHeart Radio or wherever you get your podcasts.

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Minutes into filling out my absentee ballot last week, I was momentarily distracted by my dog Seamus. A moment later, I realized in horror that I was filling in the wrong bubble — accidentally voting "no" on a ballot measure that I meant to vote "yes" on.

It was only a few ink marks, but it was noticeable enough. Trying to fix my mistake, I darkly and fully filled in the correct circle and then, as if testifying to an error on a check, put my initials next to the one I wanted.

Then I worried. As a reporter who has previously covered election security for years, I went on a mini-quest trying to understand how a small mistake can have larger repercussions.

As Los Angeles County's 5.6 million registered voters all receive ballots at home for the first time, I knew my experience could not be unique. But I wondered, would my vote count? Or would my entire ballot now be discarded?

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  • The AR environments are constructed based on real crime scene photos, police reports and eyewitness accounts.

A new augmented reality app launched this week allows anybody to feel what it's like to explore a murder site as it appeared right after the crime occurred. They may even be able to help crack an unsolved crime.

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