Dee Dee Myers Steps Down at Warner Bros as Company Transitions Toward Streaming

Dee Dee Myers, the former White House press secretary who was the inspiration for "The West Wing" character C.J. Cregg, is leaving her position as Warner Bros. head of corporate communications after a five-year stint.

Myers leaves nearly two years after telecom giant AT&T acquired Time Warner for $85 billion, shifting the media giant more toward technology and streaming services. She also helped the studio weather a tumultuous point at the company after studio chief Kevin Tsujihara stepped down amid a scandal.


"We faced our share of long days, late nights and heart-stopping headlines," Myers said in a memo to staff. "I will leave on April 1 with only the fondest memories — and a trunk full of swag."

AT&T reported last month that it lost 219,000 subscribers at its AT&T TV Now streaming service during the fourth quarter. The company also lost 945,000 premium subscribers at DirecTV and U-Verse. WarnerMedia earnings in the quarter were also down.

AT&T CFO John Stephens said at the time the company would continue to have some financial struggles as AT&T prepares to launch HBO Max in May, part of the combined company's transition toward technology services. "We expect pressure from heavy HBO Max investment, which you saw begin in the fourth quarter," he said on an earnings call.

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