Amazon Launches Its First Big-Budget Video Game, Crucible

Taylor Soper, GeekWire
Taylor Soper is GeekWire's managing editor, responsible for coordinating the newsroom, planning coverage, and editing stories. A native of Portland, Ore., and graduate of the University of Washington, he was previously a GeekWire staff reporter, covering beats including startups and sports technology. Follow him @taylor_soper and email taylor@geekwire.com.
Amazon Launches Its First Big-Budget Video Game, Crucible

Amazon took a big step into the gaming industry Wednesday with the launch of Crucible, a free-to-play online shooter and the company's first original big-budget game.

The game, available for Windows 10, is a team-based shooter that lets players hunt down opponents. It's similar to other megahits such as Overwatch, Apex Legends, and Fortnite. It was initially announced in 2016.


Crucible will be a litmus test of sorts for Amazon as it looks to dive deeper into the crowded $120 billion video game industry. Amazon acquired Twitch in 2014 for nearly $1 billion and established Amazon Game Studios eight years ago, but hasn't launched many original titles and ran into several hiccups with canceled projects and layoffs.

"This division could have been an industry juggernaut in terms of leveraging Amazon's cash reserves and tech-industry dominance," Ars Technica noted. "Instead, it has limped to its current May 2020 state."

Crucible | Extended Overviewwww.youtube.com

Crucible is developed by Relentless Studios, a Seattle-based development team of Amazon Games led by Louis Castle, co-founder of Westwood Studios.

Early response to the game are mixed, with Ars Technica giving it a lukewarm review, The Verge noting that Crucible "will find an audience that's been itching for this particular mashup of design ideas and genres in an accessible package," and Engadget praising its "surprisingly solid gameplay foundation."

Amazon plans to launch another game, New World, in August.

Bloomberg reported that Crucible and New World could be part of Amazon's plan to launch a game-streaming service that would compete with offerings from Microsoft, Google, Sony, and others.

Amazon in 2016 unveiled Twitch Prime, a series of benefits for gamers that is included as part of the an Amazon Prime or Prime Video membership.

This story first appeared on GeekWire.

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Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

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Genies representatives told dot.LA that the firm is now seeking more creators to try its creation tools for 3D avatars, digital fashion items and virtual experiences. On Thursday, the startup launched a three-week program called DIY Collective, which will mentor and financially support up-and-coming creatives.

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Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Here's What To Expect At LA Tech Week

LA Tech Week—a weeklong showcase of the region’s growing startup ecosystem—is coming this August.

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