Soylent CEO Crowley Out as Meal Replacement Startup Looks to Re-Focus Strategy on 'Core Products'

Soylent, the Los Angeles-based meal replacement startup, has shaken up its top ranks with Chief Executive Bryan Crowley stepping down and replaced by Chief Financial Officer Demir Vangelov.


The company's chairman and co-founder, Rob Rhinehart, said in a blog post that the leadership change comes as Soylent looks to change its strategy and product line to "re-focus" on its core products and bring new "innovative ideas" to the market. He also said they will seek to improve prices in a bid to bring in new business.

"Today, innovative food companies are performing record-breaking IPOs, new retailers are raising massive growth rounds, and food, agriculture, and ingredient technologies are some of the most disruptive startups in the ecosystem," he said in a statement. "But we still have a lot of work to do to fulfill Soylent's mission."

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