GoodRx Shares Soar 50% on Wall Street Debut

GoodRx Shares Soar 50% on Wall Street Debut

Prescription discount GoodRx shares skyrocketed more than 50% in its Wall Street debut on Wednesday. Shares started trading under the symbol "GDRX" at an IPO pricing of $33 each but quickly rose landing at $50.50 per share at market close.

GoodRx is the first Los Angeles tech company to go public this year and follows a wave of other tech companies that have recently gone public, including Unity and Snowflake.


Co-founded by former Facebook executive Doug Hirsch in 2011, the Santa Monica company makes money by collecting fees from pharmacy benefits managers.

The popular app provides comparison drug pricing at different pharmacies, breaking down what is often a murky market. Hirsch told dot.LA in an interview earlier this year that the idea came to him when, on a whim, he began comparing drug prices at local pharmacies and found pharmacists could not explain the difference.

Over recent years, GoodRx has boasted steady growth. The company earned $54 million in profit for the first six months ending in June, up from $31 million over the same time last year, a 74% increase. It has $697 million in debt as of June 30.

Last year, GoodRx expanded into telehealth with HeyDoctor. While patients have flocked to the new service during the pandemic, the division is less profitable than the prescription side of the business.

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