Miso Robotics Partners With AWS To Test Its Burger-Flipping Kitchen Robots

Decerry Donato

Decerry Donato is dot.LA's Editorial Fellow. Prior to that, she was an editorial intern at the company. Decerry received her bachelor's degree in literary journalism from the University of California, Irvine. She continues to write stories to inform the community about issues or events that take place in the L.A. area. On the weekends, she can be found hiking in the Angeles National forest or sifting through racks at your local thrift store.

Miso Robotics Partners With AWS To Test Its Burger-Flipping Kitchen Robots
Courtesy of Miso Robotics
Food tech startup Miso Robotics—the company behind automated kitchen robots like the Jack in the Box-approved “Flippy” and the Chipotle-approved “Chippy”—has added a major new partner in Seattle ecommerce and cloud computing giant Amazon.

On Tuesday, Pasadenia-based Miso announced it is working with Amazon Web Services’ AWS RoboMaker, a cloud-based simulation service for robotics developers, to test the software powering its Flippy 2 and Flippy Lite burger-flipping robots. The partnership is meant to help Miso to more quickly simulate its technology during testing, allowing it to turn prototypes into functional products at a faster rate.

Miso Robotics chief technology officer Chris Kruger described RoboMaker as “a gamechanger” for his company—noting that Miso “went from running 12 simulations a month with single units to doing 100 in a night.”

“Each of our robots out in the field are somewhat unique, and [using RoboMaker] we can basically develop new software and updates on a monthly basis and test them in their simulation service before we send them out into the field,” Kruger told dot.LA. While he declined to discuss the financials of the partnership, Kruger noted that AWS has dedicated a team of people to work with Miso and tailoring its services to the startup.

Kruger will also make a presentation at the upcoming Amazon re:MARS conference in Las Vegas on June 22, where he will discuss the challenges that Miso overcame and the methods it used in developing its kitchen robots. Without giving too much away, he said that one of the biggest learning curves was in communicating and interfacing with the retail operators using its technology.

“There's a lot of support out in the market for us—a market that is hungry for this type of innovation,” Kruger added.

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Regard Raises $15M for AI-Powered Software That Help Doctors Diagnose Patients

Decerry Donato

Decerry Donato is dot.LA's Editorial Fellow. Prior to that, she was an editorial intern at the company. Decerry received her bachelor's degree in literary journalism from the University of California, Irvine. She continues to write stories to inform the community about issues or events that take place in the L.A. area. On the weekends, she can be found hiking in the Angeles National forest or sifting through racks at your local thrift store.

Regard Raises $15M for AI-Powered Software That Help Doctors Diagnose Patients
Courtesy of Regard

Culver City-based health care startup Regard, which uses AI-driven software to help physicians accurately diagnose patients, has raised $15.3 million in Series A funding.

Pasadena-based Calibrate Ventures and Colorado-based Foundry Group led the investment in Regard, formerly known as HealthTensor. Other investors that participated in the round include TenOneTen Ventures, Susa Ventures, Brook Byers of Byers Capital and Dropbox CEO Drew Houston. The new funding will be used to grow Regard’s team and customer base, the company said in a press release.

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This Week in 'Raises': Regard Secures $15M, MaC Venture Capital Raises $203M for Second Fund

Decerry Donato

Decerry Donato is dot.LA's Editorial Fellow. Prior to that, she was an editorial intern at the company. Decerry received her bachelor's degree in literary journalism from the University of California, Irvine. She continues to write stories to inform the community about issues or events that take place in the L.A. area. On the weekends, she can be found hiking in the Angeles National forest or sifting through racks at your local thrift store.

This Week in 'Raises': Regard Secures $15M, MaC Venture Capital Raises $203M for Second Fund
Image by Joshua Letona

This week in “Raises”: A local healthcare startup secured funding to help grow the team and deploy its software to more physicians and hospitals, while Black-led, seed-stage venture capital firm surpassed its goal for its second fund.

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Braid Theory's Plan to Foster the Next Generation of Ocean Tech Startups

Keerthi Vedantam

Keerthi Vedantam is a bioscience reporter at dot.LA. She cut her teeth covering everything from cloud computing to 5G in San Francisco and Seattle. Before she covered tech, Keerthi reported on tribal lands and congressional policy in Washington, D.C. Connect with her on Twitter, Clubhouse (@keerthivedantam) or Signal at 408-470-0776.

Braid Theory's Plan to Foster the Next Generation of Ocean Tech Startups
Photo courtesy of the Port of Los Angeles.

San Pedro-based Braid Theory is one of the growing number of accelerators in the country looking to grow the so-called blue economy, which spans a range of ocean-related industries and is estimated at $2.5 trillion a year.

The accelerator is accepting online applications until July 18, with its second-ever program kicking off in August.

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