Concrete Has a Climate Problem. CarbonBuilt Grabs $10 Million to Help Solve It

Harri Weber

Harri is dot.LA's senior finance reporter. She previously worked for Gizmodo, Fast Company, VentureBeat and Flipboard. Find her on Twitter and send tips on L.A. startups and venture capital to harrison@dot.la.

Concrete Has a Climate Problem. CarbonBuilt Grabs $10 Million to Help Solve It
Photo by Scott Blake on Unsplash

Concrete is everywhere because it's versatile.

It's used in everything from Earth's "worst architectural eyesores" to Rome's beloved Pantheon, as the BBC laid out in a 2018 story on the material. But the production of cement poses a huge threat to the climate. It's currently responsible for a whopping 8% of global carbon emissions.


Some companies aim to chip away at this problem by swapping in other materials such as limestone. Another strategy is to trap captured carbon emissions inside concrete.

Los Angeles-based CarbonBuilt aims to profitably do both. CarbonBuilt announced Wednesday that it's raised $10 million to grow its team and further develop its tech, which the company calls "Reversa."

"A single concrete block produced using the Reversa platform is able to permanently store about ¾ of a pound of carbon dioxide," the company said in a press release. "Combined with CarbonBuilt's best-in-class economics and scalability, Reversa accelerates humanity's path towards gigatonne-scale carbon removal and even larger emissions reductions."

The deal was led by the Grantham Environmental Trust's investment fund. Other participating investors include Hyatt Hotel heir Tony Pritzker, Boston-based Lime Street Ventures and San Francisco-based Climate Capital.

Subscribe to our newsletter to catch every headline.

Cadence

This Startup Wants to Make Testing for ADHD and Dyslexia as Common as Going to an Optician

Keerthi Vedantam

Keerthi Vedantam is a bioscience reporter at dot.LA. She cut her teeth covering everything from cloud computing to 5G in San Francisco and Seattle. Before she covered tech, Keerthi reported on tribal lands and congressional policy in Washington, D.C. Connect with her on Twitter, Clubhouse (@keerthivedantam) or Signal at 408-470-0776.

This Startup Wants to Make Testing for ADHD and Dyslexia as Common as Going to an Optician
Courtesy of Polygon

Here’s how Jack Rolo describes his childhood: He was good at chess, and bad at spelling. He was good at math, and bad at reading. Rolo went on to study physics at Durham University in his native England—and despite often struggling in his courses, it wasn’t until after he graduated that he was diagnosed with dyslexia, a common language processing disorder that affects reading.

Rolo’s experiences informed his founding of Polygon, a Santa Monica-based diagnostics startup that emerged from stealth on Friday with $4.2 million in funding, and the goal of better diagnosing dyslexia, ADHD and other learning-related disabilities. The funding includes a $3.6 million seed round led by Spark Capital, as well as $600,000 in pre-seed funding led by Pear VC.

Read more Show less

ZipRecruiter CEO Ian Siegel on How the Job Market Has Shifted

Spencer Rascoff

Spencer Rascoff serves as executive chairman of dot.LA. He is an entrepreneur and company leader who co-founded Zillow, Hotwire, dot.LA, Pacaso and Supernova, and who served as Zillow's CEO for a decade. During Spencer's time as CEO, Zillow won dozens of "best places to work" awards as it grew to over 4,500 employees, $3 billion in revenue, and $10 billion in market capitalization. Prior to Zillow, Spencer co-founded and was VP Corporate Development of Hotwire, which was sold to Expedia for $685 million in 2003. Through his startup studio and venture capital firm, 75 & Sunny, Spencer is an active angel investor in over 100 companies and is incubating several more.

Ian Siegel, ZipRecruiter
Image courtesy of ZipRecruiter

On this episode of Office Hours, host Spencer Rascoff talked with ZipRecruiter CEO and founder Ian Siegel about how he built his company, the lessons he's learned along the way and how he's seen the pandemic drastically reshape the job market—probably for good.

Read more Show less
RELATEDEDITOR'S PICKS
LA TECH JOBS
interchangeLA
Trending