Concrete Has a Climate Problem. CarbonBuilt Grabs $10 Million to Help Solve It

Harri Weber

Harri is dot.LA's senior finance reporter. She previously worked for Gizmodo, Fast Company, VentureBeat and Flipboard. Find her on Twitter and send tips on L.A. startups and venture capital to harrison@dot.la.

Concrete Has a Climate Problem. CarbonBuilt Grabs $10 Million to Help Solve It
Photo by Scott Blake on Unsplash

Concrete is everywhere because it's versatile.

It's used in everything from Earth's "worst architectural eyesores" to Rome's beloved Pantheon, as the BBC laid out in a 2018 story on the material. But the production of cement poses a huge threat to the climate. It's currently responsible for a whopping 8% of global carbon emissions.


Some companies aim to chip away at this problem by swapping in other materials such as limestone. Another strategy is to trap captured carbon emissions inside concrete.

Los Angeles-based CarbonBuilt aims to profitably do both. CarbonBuilt announced Wednesday that it's raised $10 million to grow its team and further develop its tech, which the company calls "Reversa."

"A single concrete block produced using the Reversa platform is able to permanently store about ¾ of a pound of carbon dioxide," the company said in a press release. "Combined with CarbonBuilt's best-in-class economics and scalability, Reversa accelerates humanity's path towards gigatonne-scale carbon removal and even larger emissions reductions."

The deal was led by the

Grantham Environmental Trust's investment fund. Other participating investors include Hyatt Hotel heir Tony Pritzker, Boston-based Lime Street Ventures and San Francisco-based Climate Capital.

Subscribe to our newsletter to catch every headline.

Why Women’s Purchasing Power Is a Huge Advantage for Female-Led Leagues

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

Why Women’s Purchasing Power Is a Huge Advantage for Female-Led Leagues
Samson Amore

According to a Forbes report last April, both the viewership and dollars behind women’s sports at a collegiate and professional level are growing.

Read moreShow less
https://twitter.com/samsonamore
samsonamore@dot.la
LA Tech Week Day 5: Social Highlights
Evan Xie

L.A. Tech Week has brought venture capitalists, founders and entrepreneurs from around the world to the California coast. With so many tech nerds in one place, it's easy to laugh, joke and reminisce about the future of tech in SoCal.

Here's what people are saying about the fifth day of L.A. Tech Week on social:

Read moreShow less

LA Tech Week: Six LA-Based Greentech Startups to Know

Samson Amore

Samson Amore is a reporter for dot.LA. He holds a degree in journalism from Emerson College. Send tips or pitches to samsonamore@dot.la and find him on Twitter @Samsonamore.

LA Tech Week: Six LA-Based Greentech Startups to Know
Samson Amore

At Lowercarbon Capital’s LA Tech Week event Thursday, the synergy between the region’s aerospace industry and greentech startups was clear.

The event sponsored by Lowercarbon, Climate Draft (and the defunct Silicon Valley Bank’s Climate Technology & Sustainability team) brought together a handful of local startups in Hawthorne not far from LAX, and many of the companies shared DNA with arguably the region’s most famous tech resident: SpaceX.

Read moreShow less
https://twitter.com/samsonamore
samsonamore@dot.la
RELATEDEDITOR'S PICKS
Trending