Who is Honey, the LA Galaxy's New Sponsor?

Breanna De Vera

Breanna de Vera is dot.LA's editorial intern. She is currently a senior at the University of Southern California, studying journalism and English literature. She previously reported for the campus publications The Daily Trojan and Annenberg Media.

Who is Honey, the LA Galaxy's New Sponsor?

Honey has inked a deal with the L.A. Galaxy to be stitched on their right sleeve. The online shopping and discount platform will also be an online deals partner, offering discounts for L.A. Galaxy fan merchandise, and it will be featured in the Galaxy's online marketing content.

The L.A. Galaxy will launch its secondary jersey on Wednesday with the Honey logo. Herbalife Nutrition will continue to be featured on the jersey front, as it has been for the past few years.


It's the first time the team has partnered with Honey.

"We are always looking for brands that are headquartered in Southern California to align ourselves with to help communicate a message of community and SoCal atmosphere to our fans," said Robert Vartan, vice president of AEG Global Partnerships, which owns the L.A. Galaxy. "Honey was [a partner] that we felt was the right time, the right place."

Honey is a free online platform that notifies users about price drops and discounts on ecommerce sites. The Los Angeles-based startup was acquired by PayPal in 2019 for $4 billion. The Galaxy is not its first sports team partner — last year it expanded a partnership with the L.A. Clippers, and the Honey logo was also stitched onto their jersey.

The NBA was the first major U.S. sports company to let teams display partners on player jerseys, and prior to being on the Clippers' sleeve, Honey had its logo on practice jerseys and the Clippers' training center. Last season was the first time the MLS allowed sponsored sleeve patches. Vartan said that the featured jersey icon is one of the most impactful ways for sponsors to advertise their brand.

"I think the idea is to always start somewhere," he said. "But to start somewhere impactful, and we felt like in our sports kit, being on our jersey, on the sleeve is a great way to launch in a really impactful way for them."

The Major League Soccer season begins on April 17, and will have a regular 2021 season, but without fans in the stands.

"Just like every sports team, we are following all the rules and regulations and guidelines set by the public health department locally and with the state," said Vartan. "Our goal is just optimistically to be there when we do get the approval to [have fans back]."

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Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Genies Wants To Help Creators Build ‘Avatar Ecosystems’

When avatar startup Genies raised $150 million in April, the company released an unusual message to the public: “Farewell.”

The Marina del Rey-based unicorn, which makes cartoon-like avatars for celebrities and aims to “build an avatar for every single person on Earth,” didn’t go under. Rather, Genies announced it would stay quiet for a while to focus on building avatar-creation products.

Genies representatives told dot.LA that the firm is now seeking more creators to try its creation tools for 3D avatars, digital fashion items and virtual experiences. On Thursday, the startup launched a three-week program called DIY Collective, which will mentor and financially support up-and-coming creatives.

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Here's What To Expect At LA Tech Week

Christian Hetrick

Christian Hetrick is dot.LA's Entertainment Tech Reporter. He was formerly a business reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer and reported on New Jersey politics for the Observer and the Press of Atlantic City.

Here's What To Expect At LA Tech Week

LA Tech Week—a weeklong showcase of the region’s growing startup ecosystem—is coming this August.

The seven-day series of events, from Aug. 15 through Aug. 21, is a chance for the Los Angeles startup community to network, share insights and pitch themselves to investors. It comes a year after hundreds of people gathered for a similar event that allowed the L.A. tech community—often in the shadow of Silicon Valley—to flex its muscles.

From fireside chats with prominent founders to a panel on aerospace, here are some highlights from the roughly 30 events happening during LA Tech Week, including one hosted by dot.LA.

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AmazeVR Wants You To Attend K-Pop Concerts Virtually

Kristin Snyder

Kristin Snyder is an editorial intern for dot.la. She previously interned with Tiger Oak Media and led the arts section for UCLA's Daily Bruin.

AmazeVR Wants You To Attend K-Pop Concerts Virtually
Photo courtesy of AmazeVR

Virtual reality startup AmazeVR now has $17 million to further expand its VR concert experience.

The West Hollywood-based company’s latest funding amounts to a bet that virtual shows, a staple of the pandemic, are here to stay. Mirae Asset Capital led the Series B funding round, with Mirae Asset Financial Group subsidiary (Mirae Asset Venture Investment), CJ Investment, Smilegate Investment, GS Futures and LG Technology Ventures investing again. Mobile game maker Krafton joined the group—but South Korean entertainment company CJ ENM’s stake reveals AmazeVR’s plans to expand into K-pop world.

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