Behind Her Empire: Noura Sakkijha on the Ups and Downs of Launching Mejuri

Yasmin Nouri

Yasmin is the host of the "Behind Her Empire" podcast, focused on highlighting self-made women leaders and entrepreneurs and how they tackle their career, money, family and life.

Each episode covers their unique hero's journey and what it really takes to build an empire with key lessons learned along the way. The goal of the series is to empower you to see what's possible & inspire you to create financial freedom in your own life.

Launching a brand new business has its ups and downs, and Noura Sakkijha can tell you all about it.

In the early years of launching the fine jewelry brand Mejuri, Sakkijha hit burnout and learned some very difficult lessons that are now part of the story she brings to the latest episode of the Behind Her Empire podcast.


Today, Sakkijha is the CEO and co-founder of Mejuri, a high-growth brand that has sold more than 1.8 million pieces of jewelry since its inception in 2015.

Looking from the outside in, entering the jewelry market can seem like a daunting endeavor. Not only is it seemingly saturated, but it's also exceptionally expensive, she says.

Sakkijha grew up in Jordan as a third-generation jeweler. There, she noticed that traditional high-end jewelry brands always targeted men, encouraging them to buy luxe jewelry for women. In 2015, Sakkijha started Mejuri to change this narrative: A woman doesn't need a man to buy jewelry for her. She can buy it yourself.

Sakkijha successfully raised more than $40 million for her jewelry brand and shine in a competitive market. Her products have been worn by A-list celebrities like Selena Gomez, Lizzo, Justin Bieber, Ariana Grande, Oprah, and others.

In this episode, Sakkijha also discusses the difficult lessons she learned early in the business, why self-care and therapy have been game-changing for her in both her personal and professional life, and what it takes to build a high-growth brand & sell over 1.8 million pieces of jewelry since inception.

dot.LA Audience Engagement Editor Luis Gomez contributed to this post.

Want to hear more of the Behind Her Empire podcast? Subscribe on Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, iHeart Radio or wherever you get your podcasts.

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