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In a lawsuit filed this week, the California Department of Fair Employment Housing is accusing Activision Blizzard — the maker of "World of Warcraft" and "Diablo" — of fostering a pervasive "frat boy" culture where women employees were subjected to constant sexual harassment, lower pay and retaliation. Read the response from the company.

🚎 A lightweight battery bus service from Arrival is coming to Disneyland and other Anaheim attractions.

🚏 StreetsLA is testing new high-tech bus stops decked with interactive screens, cell phone chargers and scooter kiosks.

⚖️ A former executive for Irvine-based Proove Biosciences faces federal charges in connection with a $3.5 million kickback scheme.

📺 HBO and HBO Max added 2.8 million subscribers in Q2.

🖌 Hollywood agency UTA has signed Alexis Ohanian, the co-founder of Reddit.

🎞 Warner Bros. is set to produce ten or more movies exclusively for HBO Max in 2022.

🛠 The FTC voted unanimously to enforce laws that allow U.S. customers to repair their own electronic and automotive devices.

'Akin To Working In A Frat House'

"Female employees almost universally confirmed that working for (Activision) was akin to working in a frat house, which invariably involved male employees drinking and subjecting female employees to sexual harassment with no repercussion," the complaint against Activision Blizzard reads.

Snap Hits 293 Million Users, Exceeds Expectations

Snap exceeded investors' expectations after hitting 293 million users by the end of the second quarter this year, prompting shares to soar as high as nearly 17% in after-hours trading Thursday.

These LA-Based Dating Apps Are Rethinking Matchmaking

Are single people ready to drop Tinder, Bumble or even Hinge? Reporter Katherine Abando takes a look at some of the apps that have emerged from the pandemic, and some of the dating trends they've sparked.

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