USC Maps L.A.'s Known COVID-19 Cases By Neighborhood

USC Maps L.A.'s Known COVID-19 Cases By Neighborhood

Los Angeles locals have always known it is a city of neighborhoods, but this novel coronavirus has made that especially clear. The official lines on where neighborhoods begin and end, and where cases are to be found, have never seemed so murky.

On Thursday, the USC Viterbi School of Engineering released two new COVID-19 data visualizations that aim to make at least where known COVID-19 cases are being found, a little more clear.

The first is an interactive map with reported cases that's broken down by each neighborhood with accompanying statistics that tells people where cases are, how many are out there, and how their neighborhood ranks.

The visualized data is not a complete picture of all COVID-19 cases as testing has thus far been very limited. The data also doesn't break up or provide the total numbers of those tested per region.


The school plans to update the map hourly with the information, which is based on Los Angeles County data. The map with reported cases by neighborhood is a collaboration between the Viterbi School of Engineering Integrated Media Center and the Annenberg School of Communications using their joint "Crosstown" platform.


The project is funded by an Annenberg Foundation grant, which aims to provide community-level data and analysis to the people of Los Angeles.

A second data visualization charts — via line graphs -- the progression of the virus in L.A.'s neighborhoods that have the most reported cases. It is expected to be updated daily.

The second project comes from USC Viterbi School of Engineering Autonomous Networks Research Group.

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