TikTok, WeChat Ban from U.S. App Stores Set for Sunday

Tami Abdollah

Tami Abdollah was dot.LA's senior technology reporter. She was previously a national security and cybersecurity reporter for The Associated Press in Washington, D.C. She's been a reporter for the AP in Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Times and for L.A.'s NPR affiliate KPCC. Abdollah spent nearly a year in Iraq as a U.S. government contractor. A native Angeleno, she's traveled the world on $5 a day, taught trad climbing safety classes and is an avid mountaineer. Follow her on Twitter.

TikTok, WeChat Ban from U.S. App Stores Set for Sunday

The Trump administration is ordering TikTok and WeChat be banned from all U.S. mobile app stores as of Sunday, effectively pulling one of the hottest apps in America from the reach of interested new users.

The yanking of the two apps from U.S. mobile stores come after the U.S. Department of Commerce detailed on Friday exactly what President Donald Trump's Aug. 6 executive order banning "transactions" with TikTok means. Trump's ban prohibits "any provision of service to distribute or maintain" the apps in U.S. mobile app stores, the department said.


Trump issued the order over national security concerns that TikTok is sharing user data with the Chinese Communist Party and has pushed for the company's sale to a U.S.-based company.

He is set to decide on whether a deal that would make Oracle ByteDance's "trusted technology provider" is good enough to allay his security concerns. CNBC reported that the deal involved Oracle having a minority stake of less than 20% in the new global TikTok, and that ByteDance hopes to do an initial public offering on the U.S. stock exchange to address ownership concerns.

A TikTok spokesperson said Friday the company disagrees with the Commerce Department decision and is "disappointed" that it will be blocking new app downloads starting Sunday and then banning the use of the app in the U.S. starting November 12.


"Our community of 100 million U.S. users love TikTok because it's a home for entertainment, self-expression and connection, and we're committed to protecting their privacy," the spokesperson said. "We will continue to challenge the unjust executive order, which was enacted without due process and threatens to deprive the American people and small businesses across the U.S. of a significant platform for both a voice and livelihoods."

Vanessa Pappas, the interim head of TikTok, said on Twitter Friday that this type of ban would be bad for the industry and invited Facebook and Instagram to publicly join its challenge and support their litigation against the Trump administration.

"This is a moment to put aside our competition and focus on core principles like freedom of expression and due process of law," she wrote.

TikTok said that in its proposal to the U.S. it's committed to "unprecedented levels of additional transparency and accountability well beyond what other apps are willing to do, including third-party audits, verification of code security, and U.S. government oversight of U.S. data security. Plus, an American technology provider would be responsible for maintaining and operating the TikTok network in the U.S., which would include all services and data serving U.S. consumers.

TikTok's disappearance from Apple's U.S. app store and Google Play would mean that users would lose out on any security updates, general updates or maintenance for the app. That's benign enough, except that users can be targeted by bad actors through any unpatched security vulnerabilities in the future.

"An abandoned app that is no longer available from the respective app store is an app that can no longer be updated to address bugs or vulnerabilities," cloud security company Wandera wrote in a recent report. "This means they are now in a prime position to be exploited by hackers, offering fake updates, or targeting known vulnerabilities that were never patched."

TikTok ranks fourth among free apps offered in Apple's U.S. app store. Data analytics firm Sensor Tower said it sees no evidence the news has caused a rush on installs, though there's plenty of anecdotal data showing increased interest.

Sensor Tower reported that the threat of Tiktok's ban resulted in a spike of downloads for its competitors in July. TikTok's monthly active users have grown across the U.S. app store and in Google Play by 51% from January to August, and increased slightly since June despite the threat of the ban.


___

Reporter Sam Blake contributed to this report.


Do you have a story that needs to be told? My DMs are open on Twitter @latams. You can also email me at tami(at)dot.la, or ask for my contact on Signal, for more secure and private communications.

Subscribe to our newsletter to catch every headline.

Cadence

Illumix Founder Kirin Sinha On Using Math to Inform Creative Thinking

Yasmin Nouri

Yasmin is the host of the "Behind Her Empire" podcast, focused on highlighting self-made women leaders and entrepreneurs and how they tackle their career, money, family and life.

Each episode covers their unique hero's journey and what it really takes to build an empire with key lessons learned along the way. The goal of the series is to empower you to see what's possible & inspire you to create financial freedom in your own life.

Illumix Founder Kirin Sinha
Photo courtesy of Illumix

Kirin Sinha wanted to be a dancer. When injury dashed that dream, she turned to her other passion: math.

On this week’s episode of the Behind Her Empire podcast, host Yasmin Nouri talks with the founder and CEO of augmented reality (AR) technology and media platform Illumix.

Read more Show less

Rael Raises $35M To Grow Its Organic Feminine Care Brand

Kristin Snyder

Kristin Snyder is an editorial intern for dot.la. She previously interned with Tiger Oak Media and led the arts section for UCLA's Daily Bruin.

Rael Raises $35M To Grow Its Organic Feminine Care Brand
Courtesy of Rael

Rael, a Buena Park-based organic feminine care and beauty brand, has raised $35 million in a Series B funding round, the company announced Wednesday.

The funding was led by the venture arms of two Asian companies: Japanese gaming firm Colopl’s Colopl Next and South Korean conglomerate Shinsegae Group’s Signite Partners. Aarden Partners and ST Capital also participated, as did existing investors Mirae Asset and Unilever Ventures.

Read more Show less

E-Scooter Companies Are Quietly Changing Their Low-Income Programs in LA

Maylin Tu
Maylin Tu is a freelance writer who lives in L.A. She writes about scooters, bikes and micro-mobility. Find her hovering by the cheese at your next local tech mixer.
E-Scooter Companies Are Quietly Changing Their Low-Income Programs in LA
Photo by Maylin Tu

When Lime launched in Los Angeles in 2018, the company offered five free rides per day to low-income riders, so long as they were under 30 minutes each.

But in early May, that changed. Rides under 30 minutes now cost low-income Angelenos a flat rate of $1.25. As for the five free rides per day, that program ended December 2021 and was replaced by a rate of $0.50 fee to unlock e-scooters, plus $0.07 per minute (and tax).

Lime isn’t alone. Lyft and Spin have changed the terms of their city-mandated low-income programs. Community advocates say they were left largely unaware.

Read more Show less
RELATEDEDITOR'S PICKS
LA TECH JOBS
interchangeLA
Trending