LA Tech Updates: Jukin Media Gets a New Co-CEO; Snap Expands Developer Program

Here are the latest updates on news affecting Los Angeles' startup and tech communities. Sign up for our newsletter and follow dot.LA on Twitter for more.

Today:

  • Jukin Media Promotes Lee Eisner to Co-CEO
  • Snap's Accelerator Program Expands with 'Yellow Collabs'

    Lee Essner, is co-chief executive officer of Jukin Media

    Jukin Media Promotes Lee Eisner to Co-CEO

    Jukin Media, a global entertainment company focused on user-generated content, has promoted its former president and chief operating officer, Lee Essner, to co-chief executive officer, the company announced Thursday.

    Essner will split the top title with Jonathan Skogmo, Jukin Media's founder. The company also announced the promotion of two other key executives on Thursday, including Anton Reut, who served as Jukin's former executive vice president and chief product officer and fills Essner's shoes as COO; and Civonne Ahal, who served as VP for rights management who will become a senior VP in that role.

    Essner began working with Jukin in 2013 and has helped the company grow from a 20-person startup solely at its headquarters in Los Angeles to more than 200 people at offices in L.A., New York, London and New Delhi, the company said in a news release.

    As co-CEO, Essner will continue overseeing Jukin's brand, sales, corporate business development, operations, legal and finance operations. Skogmo will oversee the company's licensing business, original productions, marketing, creative, development and culture.

    The company has fared well during the pandemic but recently said it needed to take Paycheck Protection Program funds to help save some jobs.

    Snap's Accelerator Program Expands with 'Yellow Collabs'

    Snap announced its taking applications for its remote, 13-week program aimed at companies and their developers. Dubbed Yellow Collabs, the program, which runs September 21 through December 18, lets developers work closely with the Snap team to better understand how to build on its platform. The deadline is for applications is August 16.

    Participants will get weekly office hours with Snap experts, as well as access to a monthly speaker series and other networking events. At the end of the program, each company will present their developed products in a showcase event.

    Two years ago, the Santa Monica-based social media startup introduced its Yellow Accelerator developer platform with the goal of filling "a need to support startups at the intersection of creativity and technology," Snap spokesperson Liz Goodno said.

    Over the past year, the launchpad provided support to 10 companies with an $150,000 investment in exchange for equity and led them through a three-month program offering funding, mentorship, commercial partnerships, networking events and office space. The Yellow Collabs program is an extension of this effort, allowing select companies who weren't selected for the full Accelerator Program to attend the trainings, Snap said.

    "While the first touch point with our community has been the Yellow Accelerator, our mission has evolved to build an ecosystem facilitating the connectivity between three main participants: Founders, Investors & Snap," Snap spokesperson Liz Goodno said. "Yellow Collabs focuses specifically on integration with Snapchat through our portfolio of developer tools, while widening the scope of companies (i.e. stage and size) we can engage with."

    Today, more than 800 apps have integrated into Snap's platform — and almost 150 million app users engage with these integrations each month.

    Subscribe to our newsletter to catch every headline.

    dot.LA is kicking off its inaugural summit Tuesday with a line-up of the players, investors and executives shaping tech and media in Los Angeles, including the head of Reese Witherspoon's Hello Sunshine media company, Silicon Valley's top dealmaker Bill Gurley and GoodRx CEO Doug Hirsch.

    Read more Show less

    I have long been a proponent of going public because I believe it creates stronger, more disciplined companies that deliver greater shareholder value. It's great to see the pendulum in the founder and venture capital community swinging away from the "stay private longer" attitude that dominated tech over the last decade.

    That said, the traditional IPO listing path has many shortcomings. I experienced this firsthand in 2011 when we took Zillow public. The cover price on the original S-1 was $12-$14 a share, but we upped it to $14-$16 due to strong demand on the IPO roadshow. We priced it at $20 a share, only to watch the first trade open at $60 that day. (Note: Zillow has since done a 3-for-1 stock split, so divide these numbers by three if you're trying to compare it with today's ~ $100 stock price.)

    Read more Show less

    If the rule is to follow the money, then VC deal flow shows how singularly bad this pandemic has been for female entrepreneurs compared to their male peers.

    By and large, anytime a woman was involved in the founding of a company, venture capital investment dollars dropped significantly and there were fewer dollars per deal overall, according to a dot.LA analysis of year-over-year Q3 PitchBook data for Los Angeles, the Bay Area and Seattle.

    Read more Show less
    RELATEDEDITOR'S PICKS

    Trending