Relativity Space Co-Founder Jordan Noone Steps Down, Hints at 'Next Venture'

Relativity Space Co-Founder Jordan Noone Steps Down, Hints at 'Next Venture'

Relativity Space co-founder and CTO Jordan Noone announced on Twitter Wednesday that he began a transition to the role of executive advisor earlier this week "in preparation for starting my next venture."


Noone did not provide details on what that venture may be and the company did not respond immediately respond to a request for comment.

Tim Ellis, Relativity Space's co-founder and CEO, said in his own tweet that it's been an "absolute honor and privilege" to partner with Noone to build Relativity Space, which aims, eventually, to print 3D rockets on Mars.


A former SpaceX engineer, Noone, met Ellis while they were both students at the University of Southern California and involved with the Rocket Propulsion Lab, a student group that builds its own rockets.

They would go on to found the company in 2015 with a $500,000 from investor Mark Cuban.

In his tweet, Noone said, "@relativityspace has been the dream of a lifetime."

The company recently hit a number of key benchmarks to help bring it closer to its goals.

In June, the Los Angeles-based company announced an agreement with the U.S. Air Force's 30th Space Wing to develop rocket launch facilities at Vandenberg Air Force Base and a separate contract with Iridiums Communications Inc. to deliver satellites into orbit using Relativity's 3D printed launch vehicle.

Relativity closed its $140 million Series C funding round led by Bond and Tribe Capital in October. The company is also backed by investors Playground Global, Y Combinator, Social Capital, and Mark Cuban.

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