Love in the Time of COVID-19 is Virtually Booming, Tinder Says

Love in the Time of COVID-19 is Virtually Booming, Tinder Says

The novel coronavirus may have forced people into physical isolation, but it has not stopped people from trying to romantically connect with others. It appears, in fact, that love in the time of COVID-19 is virtually booming.

That's according to data provided by online dating app Tinder. The West Hollywood-based company says that starting mid-March -- as the numbers of those infected with the novel virus began to climb and many people were ordered to stay home -- daily messages were up 10-15% compared to the week prior in the U.S.


In Italy and Spain, daily conversation was up 25% compared to the week prior and conversation length was up anywhere from 10-30% over February in places like Europe and Southeast Asia.

People have also taken to using key trending public health terms in their bios, or app profiles. Top terms include "stay home," "be safe," "social distancing" and "wash your hands."

Tinder CEO Elie Seidman said in a message released this week that the team is working to remove geographic barriers so that people can match and chat with someone new no matter their location. As a result, Tinder allowed all subscribers to use its Passport feature for free.

The company is also strongly urging those who do connect to keep their interactions digital for now.

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